This catalog has a page for every eclipse from 2000 BC to 3000 AD, 23,962 in all, shown in groups of 20 years at a time. You can go to any eclipse by selecting the milennium, century and 20-year period from the navigation tabs above; then click on an eclipse's date in the list below to to go its page.

You can see the solar or lunar eclipses separately by clicking "Solar Eclipses" or "Lunar Eclipses" in the top-right tabs.

All Eclipses, 2021–2040 AD

Note that eclipse dates are specified relative to UT. You have not selected a timezone for eclipse timings, so all times are shown in UT (essentially GMT).
26 May, 2021 AD
08:47–13:49 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.01; Saros 121)
The Moon will barely edge into total eclipse for just 14 minutes and 30 seconds. With the Moon just barely inside the Earth's umbral shadow, the Moon may be quite bright, but even so, this should be worth seeing for observers from the western Americas, the Pacific, Australia, and south-east Asia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 7 minutes in total.
10 Jun, 2021 AD
08:12–13:11 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.94; Saros 147)
The Sun will be 94% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 3 minutes and 51 seconds and covering a very broad path, 527 km wide at maximum. It will be visible in northern Canada, the arctic, and far north-eastern Russia. The partial eclipse will be visible from Canada, most of Europe, and much of Asia.
19 Nov, 2021 AD
06:02–12:03 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 126)
The Moon will be almost covered by the Earth's shadow in a very deep partial eclipse, lasting 3 hours and 28 minutes and visible in east Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and the Americas. With 97% of the Moon in shadow at maximum eclipse, this will be quite a memorable event.
4 Dec, 2021 AD
05:29–09:37 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 152)
The Sun will be darkened for 1 minute and 54 seconds by a dramatic total eclipse covering a very broad path, 419 km wide at maximum. This will be a sight worth seeing, and will be visible from Antarctica. The partial eclipse will be visible in Antarctica and South Africa.
30 Apr, 2022 AD
18:45–22:37 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.64; Saros 119)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 64% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle for observers from the south Pacific and extreme western South America.
16 May, 2022 AD
01:32–06:50 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.41; Saros 131)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 25 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 41% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers in the Americas, western Europe, and most of Africa. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 27 minutes in total.
25 Oct, 2022 AD
08:58–13:02 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.86; Saros 124)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 86% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it in most of Europe, the Middle East, and western Asia.
8 Nov, 2022 AD
08:02–13:56 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.36; Saros 136)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 25 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 36% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers from most of Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and North and Central America. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 40 minutes in total.
20 Apr, 2023 AD
01:34–06:59 UT
Hybrid Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.01; Saros 129)
The Sun will be darkened for 1 minute and 16 seconds by a dramatic hybrid eclipse covering a narrow path at most 49 km wide. This will be a sight worth seeing, and will be visible in extreme north-western Australia, East Timor, and Indonesia. The partial eclipse will be visible across Australia and southeast Asia.
5 May, 2023 AD
15:14–19:31 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.96; Saros 141)
The Moon will approach within 5% of the Earth's umbral shadow at maximum eclipse; 96% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth, with the overall eclipse lasting 4 hours and 18 minutes. While less dramatic than a partial eclipse (as no part of the Moon will be in complete shadow), a shading across the Moon should be readily visible to observers from most of Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia.
14 Oct, 2023 AD
15:03–20:55 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.95; Saros 134)
The Sun will be 95% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 5 minutes and 17 seconds and covering a broad path up to 187 km wide. It will be visible in the USA, central America and south America. The partial eclipse will be visible across most of the Americas.
28 Oct, 2023 AD
18:01–22:26 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.12; Saros 146)
At maximum eclipse, a small bite out of the Moon should be visible from most of Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia. The eclipse will last for 1 hour and 17 minutes, with just 12% of the Moon in shadow at maximum.
25 Mar, 2024 AD
04:53–09:32 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.96; Saros 113)
At maximum eclipse, 96% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth, which will cause a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may be visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon will be in complete shadow. The eclipse will last 4 hours and 39 minutes overall, and will be visible from far eastern Asia and Australia, the Americas, and western Europe and Africa.
8 Apr, 2024 AD
15:42–20:52 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 139)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 28 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 198 km wide. It will be seen across north-west Mexico, the U.S. from Texas to Maine, and maritime Canada. The partial eclipse will be visible over almost all of North America.
18 Sep, 2024 AD
00:41–04:47 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.08; Saros 118)
A tiny bite out of the Moon may be visible at maximum, though just 8% of the Moon will be shadowed in a partial eclipse lasting for 1 hour and 3 minutes and visible across the Americas, Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. A shading across the moon from the Earth's penumbral shadow should be visible at maximum eclipse.
2 Oct, 2024 AD
15:42–21:46 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.93; Saros 144)
A small annular eclipse will cover only 93% of the Sun in a very broad path, 266 km wide at maximum, and will last 7 minutes and 25 seconds. It will be visible across the Pacific, in Easter Island, and the southern tip of South America, just missing the Falkland Islands. The partial eclipse will be visible across the Pacific and in southern South America.
14 Mar, 2025 AD
03:57–10:00 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.18; Saros 123)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 1 hour and 5 minutes. The Moon will be 18% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened for viewers from the Americas and extreme western Africa. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 38 minutes in total.
29 Mar, 2025 AD
08:50–12:43 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.94; Saros 149)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 94% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it in Greenland, Iceland, northern and western Europe and north-west Africa.
7 Sep, 2025 AD
15:28–20:55 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.36; Saros 128)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 22 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 36% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers in most of Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 29 minutes in total.
21 Sep, 2025 AD
17:29–21:53 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.86; Saros 154)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 86% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it in New Zealand, the southern Pacific, and parts of Antarctica.
17 Feb, 2026 AD
09:56–14:27 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.96; Saros 121)
The Sun will be 96% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 2 minutes and 20 seconds and covering a very broad path, 616 km wide at maximum. It will be visible from a small region in Antarctica. The partial eclipse will be visible over Antarctica and south-eastern Africa.
3 Mar, 2026 AD
08:44–14:22 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.15; Saros 133)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 58 minutes and 18 seconds. The Moon will be 15% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened for viewers in east Asia, Australia, North America, and Central America. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 27 minutes in total.
12 Aug, 2026 AD
15:34–19:57 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 126)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 18 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 294 km wide at maximum. It will be seen north-eastern Greenland, west Iceland, Spain, and the Balearics. The partial eclipse will be visible Canada and parts of the northern US, and western Europe and north Africa.
28 Aug, 2026 AD
01:23–07:01 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.93; Saros 138)
The Moon will be almost covered by the Earth's shadow in a very deep partial eclipse, lasting 3 hours and 18 minutes and visible from the Americas and western Europe and Africa. With 93% of the Moon in shadow at maximum eclipse, this will be quite a memorable event.
6 Feb, 2027 AD
12:57–19:01 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.93; Saros 131)
A small annular eclipse will cover only 93% of the Sun in a very broad path, 282 km wide at maximum, and will last 7 minutes and 51 seconds. It will be visible across southern South America, and just barely the Guinea coast of Africa. The partial eclipse will be visible across most of South America and western North Africa.
20 Feb, 2027 AD
21:12 on 20 Feb–01:13 on 21 Feb UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.93; Saros 143)
At maximum eclipse, 93% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth, which will cause a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may be visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon will be in complete shadow. The eclipse will last 4 hours and 1 minute overall, and will be visible from the eastern Americas, Europe, Africa, and most of Asia.
18 Jul, 2027 AD
15:56–16:08 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.00; Saros 110)
In this virtually non-existant eclipse, the Moon barely clips the edge of the Earth's penumbral shadow; although the eclipse will last 11 minutes and 48 seconds, it will be impossible to see in practice. The full Moon itself will be visible from south-eastern Africa, south Asia, and Australia, and of course will be a lovely sight as always.
2 Aug, 2027 AD
07:30–12:43 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.08; Saros 136)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 23 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 258 km wide at maximum. It will be seen across the southern tip of Spain, Gibraltar, and North Africa, and the Middle East. The partial eclipse will be visible across most of Africa, Europe, and south Asia.
17 Aug, 2027 AD
05:24–09:03 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.55; Saros 148)
This very subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse will be essentially invisible to the naked eye; though it will last 3 hours and 39 minutes, just 55% of the Moon's disc will be in partial shadow (with no part of it in complete shadow). The full Moon itself will be visible from eastern Australia and New Zealand, the Americas, and far western Africa.
12 Jan, 2028 AD
02:07–06:18 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.07; Saros 115)
A tiny bite out of the Moon may be visible at maximum, though just 7% of the Moon will be shadowed in a partial eclipse lasting for 56 minutes exactly and visible in the Americas, Europe, and most of Africa. A shading across the moon from the Earth's penumbral shadow should be visible at maximum eclipse.
26 Jan, 2028 AD
12:06–18:08 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.92; Saros 141)
A small annular eclipse will cover only 92% of the Sun in a very broad path, 323 km wide at maximum, and will last 10 minutes and 27 seconds. It will be visible across South America through Ecuador, Peru, Brazil, and French Guiana; in Funchal; and in Tangier and southern Spain and Portugal. The partial eclipse will be visible from most of the Americas, Spain, Portugal, and north-west Africa.
6 Jul, 2028 AD
15:44–20:54 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.39; Saros 120)
The Earth's shadow on the moon will be clearly visible in this eclipse, with 39% of the Moon in shadow; the partial eclipse will last for 2 hours and 22 minutes and will be visible from most of Africa, south and east Europe, Asia, and Australia.
22 Jul, 2028 AD
00:27–05:23 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 146)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 10 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 230 km wide. It will be seen in the Cocos islands, Christmas island, across Australia from northern Western Australia to Sydney, and across the South Island of New Zealand at Dunedin. The partial eclipse will be visible across south-east Asia and Australia.
31 Dec, 2028 AD
14:03–19:40 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.25; Saros 125)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 11 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 25% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers in north-east Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia, north-western Canada, and Alaska. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 29 minutes in total.
14 Jan, 2029 AD
15:01–19:22 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.87; Saros 151)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 87% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it across North and Central America.
12 Jun, 2029 AD
02:26–05:43 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.46; Saros 118)
A small partial eclipse will be visible in extreme northern Europe, Asia and Canada. With just 46% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this will be of limited interest.
26 Jun, 2029 AD
00:34–06:09 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.84; Saros 130)
A dramatic total eclipse lasting 1 hour and 42 minutes will plunge the full Moon into deep darkness, as it passes right through the centre of the Earth's umbral shadow. While the visual effect of a total eclipse is variable, the Moon may be stained a deep orange or red colour at maximum eclipse. This will be a great spectacle for everyone who sees it from most of the Americas and western Europe and Africa. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 40 minutes in total.
11 Jul, 2029 AD
14:27–16:43 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.23; Saros 156)
A small partial eclipse will be visible in the tip of South America. With just 23% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this will be of limited interest.
5 Dec, 2029 AD
13:06–16:58 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.89; Saros 123)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 89% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it across Antarctica.
20 Dec, 2029 AD
19:42 on 20 Dec–01:40 on 21 Dec UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.12; Saros 135)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 53 minutes and 42 seconds. The Moon will be 12% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened for viewers in eastern North and South America, all of Europe, Africa, and the Middle East, and most of Asia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 33 minutes in total.
1 Jun, 2030 AD
03:34–09:21 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.94; Saros 128)
The Sun will be 94% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 5 minutes and 21 seconds and covering a very broad path, 250 km wide at maximum. It will be visible in Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Greece, Turkey, Russia, Kazakhstan, China, and Japan. The partial eclipse will be visible across northern Africa, Europe, and most of Asia.
15 Jun, 2030 AD
16:14–20:52 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.50; Saros 140)
The Earth's shadow on the moon will be clearly visible in this eclipse, with 50% of the Moon in shadow; the partial eclipse will last for 2 hours and 24 minutes and will be visible from most of Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia.
25 Nov, 2030 AD
04:16–09:23 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 44 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 169 km wide. It will be seen across Namibia, Botswana, South Africa, Lesotho, and south-eastern Australia. The partial eclipse will be visible from southern Africa , the southern Indian Ocean, Australia, and Antarctica.
9 Dec, 2030 AD
20:07 on 9 Dec–00:47 on 10 Dec UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.94; Saros 145)
This subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse may be visible to a skilled observer at maximum eclipse. 94% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth (none of it will be in total shadow), which will cause a gentle shadow gradient across its disc at maximum; the eclipse as a whole will last 4 hours and 39 minutes. The Moon will be visible from the Americas, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and most of Asia.
7 May, 2031 AD
01:52–05:49 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.88; Saros 112)
At maximum eclipse, 88% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth, which will cause a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may be visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon will be in complete shadow. The eclipse will last 3 hours and 57 minutes overall, and will be visible in the Americas and western Europe and Africa.
21 May, 2031 AD
04:13–10:15 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.96; Saros 138)
The Sun will be 96% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 5 minutes and 26 seconds and covering a path up to 152 km wide. It will be visible across Angola, Zambia, D.R. Congo, Tanzania, southern India and northern Sri Lanka, the Nicobar islands, Thailand and Malaysia, and Indonesia. The partial eclipse will be visible from much of Africa, the Middle East, and south Asia.
5 Jun, 2031 AD
10:56–12:31 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.13; Saros 150)
In this extremely marginal eclipse, the Moon barely clips the edge of the Earth's penumbral shadow. This will cause a microscopic darkening of just 13% of the Moon's disc for 1 hour and 36 minutes, which will be essentially impossible to see. The full Moon itself will be visible from east Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and the western Americas, and of course will be a lovely sight as always.
30 Oct, 2031 AD
05:49–09:41 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.72; Saros 117)
This subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse may be visible to a skilled observer at maximum eclipse. 72% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth (none of it will be in total shadow), which will cause a gentle shadow gradient across its disc at maximum; the eclipse as a whole will last 3 hours and 52 minutes. The Moon will be visible in the Americas, eastern Asia and Australia, and western Europe and Africa.
14 Nov, 2031 AD
18:22–23:49 UT
Hybrid Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.01; Saros 143)
The Sun will be darkened for 1 minute and 8 seconds by a dramatic hybrid eclipse covering a narrow path at most 38 km wide. This will be a sight worth seeing, and will be visible from the Pacific Ocean and Panama. The partial eclipse will be visible from the Pacific, the southern US, and central America.
25 Apr, 2032 AD
12:22–18:04 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.19; Saros 122)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 1 hour and 6 minutes. The Moon will be 19% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened for viewers from south and east Asia, Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 31 minutes in total.
9 May, 2032 AD
11:09–15:41 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.00; Saros 148)
A large annular eclipse will cover over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 44 km wide; it will last just 22 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It will be seen from a tiny band in the Southern Ocean. The partial eclipse will be visible in southern South America and Africa.
18 Oct, 2032 AD
16:24–21:40 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.10; Saros 127)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 47 minutes and 6 seconds. The Moon will be 10% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened for viewers in Europe and Asia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 16 minutes in total.
3 Nov, 2032 AD
03:22–07:43 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.86; Saros 153)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 86% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it across central and eastern Asia.
30 Mar, 2033 AD
15:59–20:02 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 120)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 37 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 781 km wide at maximum. It will be seen in a broad path curving around the Arctic, clipping the far eastern tip of Russia, and taking in north-western Alaska. The partial eclipse will be visible across most of North America.
14 Apr, 2033 AD
16:11–22:13 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.09; Saros 132)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 49 minutes and 12 seconds. The Moon will be 9% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened for viewers from Europe, Africa, most of Asia, and Australia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 35 minutes in total.
23 Sep, 2033 AD
11:47–15:58 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.69; Saros 125)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 69% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle for observers from southern South America.
8 Oct, 2033 AD
08:18–13:31 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.35; Saros 137)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 19 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 35% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers in east Asia, Australia, New Zealand, North and Central America, and north-western South America. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 22 minutes in total.
20 Mar, 2034 AD
07:39–12:54 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 130)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 9 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 159 km wide. It will be seen from Nigeria, northern Cameroon, Chad, Sudan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, the Himalayas, and Tibet. The partial eclipse will be visible across most of Europe, Africa, and western and central Asia.
3 Apr, 2034 AD
16:52–21:18 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.85; Saros 142)
This subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse may be visible to a skilled observer at maximum eclipse. 85% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth (none of it will be in total shadow), which will cause a gentle shadow gradient across its disc at maximum; the eclipse as a whole will last 4 hours and 25 minutes. The Moon will be visible in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia.
12 Sep, 2034 AD
13:26–19:09 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 135)
A large annular eclipse will cover 97% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a path up to 102 km wide; it will last 2 minutes and 58 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It will be seen from Chile, Bolivia, Argentina, Paraguay, Brazil, and Gough Island. The partial eclipse will be visible across Central and South America.
28 Sep, 2034 AD
00:41–04:50 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.01; Saros 147)
A tiny bite out of the Moon may be visible at maximum, though just 1% of the Moon will be shadowed in a partial eclipse lasting for 26 minutes and 42 seconds and visible in the Americas, Europe, and Africa. A shading across the moon from the Earth's penumbral shadow should be visible at maximum eclipse.
22 Feb, 2035 AD
06:56–11:12 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.97; Saros 114)
At maximum eclipse, 97% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth, which will cause a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may be visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon will be in complete shadow. The eclipse will last 4 hours and 16 minutes overall, and will be visible from east Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and the Americas.
9 Mar, 2035 AD
20:20 on 9 Mar–01:48 on 10 Mar UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 31 km wide; it will last 48 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It will be seen across central New Zealand and Reao Atoll in the Tuamotos. The partial eclipse will be visible in eastern Australia, New Zealand, and the south Pacific.
19 Aug, 2035 AD
22:46 on 18 Aug–03:35 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.10; Saros 119)
At maximum eclipse, a small bite out of the Moon should be visible in eastern North America, South America, Europe, Africa, and western Asia. The eclipse will last for 1 hour and 17 minutes, with just 10% of the Moon in shadow at maximum.
2 Sep, 2035 AD
23:15 on 1 Sep–04:35 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.03; Saros 145)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 54 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 116 km wide. It will be seen in China, the Koreas, and Japan. The partial eclipse will be visible from eastern Asia and the Pacific.
11 Feb, 2036 AD
19:33 on 11 Feb–00:49 on 12 Feb UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.30; Saros 124)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 15 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 30% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers from the eastern Americas, Europe, Africa, and most of Asia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 22 minutes in total.
27 Feb, 2036 AD
02:47–06:43 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.63; Saros 150)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 63% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle for observers in south-eastern Africa, south Asia, and Antarctica.
23 Jul, 2036 AD
09:33–11:27 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.20; Saros 117)
With only 20% of the Sun covered at maximum eclipse, this will be a very marginal eclipse at best, and rather uninteresting. It will be visible across eastern Brazil, Africa, southern Europe, and south Asia.
7 Aug, 2036 AD
23:45 on 6 Aug–05:57 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.45; Saros 129)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 35 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 45% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers in most of the Americas, Europe, and Africa. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 51 minutes in total.
21 Aug, 2036 AD
15:33–19:15 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.86; Saros 155)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 86% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it from Alaska, most of Canada and western Europe and Africa.
16 Jan, 2037 AD
07:41–11:53 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.70; Saros 122)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 70% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle for observers from Europe, north Africa, and the Middle East.
31 Jan, 2037 AD
11:24–16:36 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.21; Saros 134)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 4 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 21% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers in north and west North America, most of Asia, Australia and New Zealand. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 18 minutes in total.
13 Jul, 2037 AD
00:14–05:03 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 127)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 58 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 201 km wide. It will be seen across central Australia and in the North Island of New Zealand. The partial eclipse will be visible in southern Asia and Australia.
27 Jul, 2037 AD
01:18–06:58 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.81; Saros 139)
The Moon will be strikingly shadowed in this deep partial eclipse lasting 3 hours and 12 minutes, with 81% of the Moon in darkness at maximum. The eclipse will be visible in the Americas and western Europe and Africa.
5 Jan, 2038 AD
10:58–16:32 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 132)
A large annular eclipse will cover 97% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a path up to 107 km wide; it will last 3 minutes and 18 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It will be seen through the Antilles, and across Africa from Liberia to Egypt. The partial eclipse will be visible in northern South America, western Europe, and most of Africa.
21 Jan, 2038 AD
01:45–05:51 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.90; Saros 144)
At maximum eclipse, 90% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth, which will cause a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may be visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon will be in complete shadow. The eclipse will last 4 hours and 6 minutes overall, and will be visible from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and western Asia.
17 Jun, 2038 AD
01:15–04:11 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.44; Saros 111)
This very subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse will be essentially invisible to the naked eye; though it will last 2 hours and 56 minutes, just 44% of the Moon's disc will be in partial shadow (with no part of it in complete shadow). The full Moon itself will be visible in most of North America, South America, Europe, and Africa.
2 Jul, 2038 AD
10:36–16:26 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 137)
A large annular eclipse will cover over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 31 km wide; it will last 1 minute exactly at the point of maximum eclipse. It will be seen across Colombia and Venezula, barely in Grenada and Barbados, and in Africa from Western Sahara to Kenya. The partial eclipse will be visible in the eastern US and north-eastern South America, and most of Europe and Africa.
16 Jul, 2038 AD
09:58–13:10 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.50; Saros 149)
This very subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse will be essentially invisible to the naked eye; though it will last 3 hours and 12 minutes, just 50% of the Moon's disc will be in partial shadow (with no part of it in complete shadow). The full Moon itself will be visible in the western Americas, east Asia, Australia and New Zealand.
11 Dec, 2038 AD
15:34–19:52 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.80; Saros 116)
This subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse may be visible to a skilled observer at maximum eclipse. 80% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth (none of it will be in total shadow), which will cause a gentle shadow gradient across its disc at maximum; the eclipse as a whole will last 4 hours and 19 minutes. The Moon will be visible from Europe, Africa, Asia, and north-western North America.
26 Dec, 2038 AD
22:19 on 25 Dec–03:37 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.03; Saros 142)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 18 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 95 km wide. It will be seen from Western Australia, South Australia, New South Wales, and central New Zealand. The partial eclipse will be visible across south Asia, Australia and New Zealand.
6 Jun, 2039 AD
16:24–21:21 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.88; Saros 121)
The Moon will be strikingly shadowed in this deep partial eclipse lasting 2 hours and 59 minutes, with 88% of the Moon in darkness at maximum. The eclipse will be visible in Europe, Asia, Australia, and New Zealand.
21 Jun, 2039 AD
14:34–19:47 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.95; Saros 147)
The Sun will be 95% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 4 minutes and 5 seconds and covering a very broad path, 365 km wide at maximum. It will be visible across Alaska and Yukon, northern Greenland, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Russia, abd Belarus. The partial eclipse will be visible across North America, the north coast of Russia, and far western Europe.
30 Nov, 2039 AD
13:55–19:55 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.94; Saros 126)
The Moon will be almost covered by the Earth's shadow in a very deep partial eclipse, lasting 3 hours and 26 minutes and visible from eastern Europe and Africa, Asia, Australia and New Zealand. With 94% of the Moon in shadow at maximum eclipse, this will be quite a memorable event.
15 Dec, 2039 AD
14:17–18:26 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 152)
The Sun will be darkened for 1 minute and 51 seconds by a dramatic total eclipse covering a very broad path, 380 km wide at maximum. This will be a sight worth seeing, and will be visible from Antarctica. The partial eclipse will be visible in Antarctica and the extreme tip of South America.
11 May, 2040 AD
01:55–05:28 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.53; Saros 119)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 53% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle for observers in New Zealand and south-eastern Australia.
26 May, 2040 AD
09:04–14:25 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.53; Saros 131)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 32 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 53% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers from south-east Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and the western Americas. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 31 minutes in total.
4 Nov, 2040 AD
17:07–21:07 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.81; Saros 124)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 81% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it from North and Central America.
18 Nov, 2040 AD
16:06–22:00 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.40; Saros 136)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 28 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 40% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers from Europe, Asia, and Australia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 40 minutes in total.