This page has some information and maps for some solar eclipses of historic interest.

I've tried to pick out eclipses which are of historical, scientific, or religious interest; if there are any others you think should be listed, please don't hesitate to let me know. Various eclipses are shown for the period around 24-34 AD, as these may be of interest relative to the crucifixion of Jesus; note, though, that an eclipse of the Sun can only happen at the New Moon, whereas Passover begins at the Full Moon.

Only rough maps are given for these eclipses. It's not possible to be more accurate for eclipses in the remote past, due to the erratic changes in the rotation of the Earth, which result in uncertainty over which part of the Earth was facing the eclipse at a given moment. Experts estimate that locations of eclipses in 1 AD, for example, could be off by over one degree in longitude, which could be an error of 60 miles or more. See What's the Time? for some more information on this subject.

NASA has more information on Solar Eclipses Of Historical Interest.

All Historical Eclipses

Note that eclipse dates are specified relative to UT. You have not selected a timezone for eclipse timings, so all times are shown in UT (essentially GMT).
3 May, 1375 BC
max: 04:51 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.03; Saros 16)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 7 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 158 km wide. It was seen in the Middle East, Central Asia, and northern Russia. The partial eclipse was visible across much of Europe and most of Asia.

This may be the eclipse documented on a clay tablet found in 1948 among the ruins of the ancient city of Ugarit: "On the day of the new moon, in the month of Hiyar, the Sun was put to shame, and went down in the daytime, with Mars in attendance". If so, this is one of the earliest documented eclipses. Another candidate eclipse matching the Ugarit description is the eclipse of 5 March, 1223 BC.
5 Jun, 1302 BC
max: 02:10 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.08; Saros 26)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 25 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 272 km wide at maximum. It was seen in India, south-east Asia, and the Pacific. The partial eclipse was visible across southern and eastern Asia, Alaska, and north-west Canada.

This eclipse was documented in ancient China, one one of the earliest documented eclipses: "Three flames ate the sun, and big stars were seen."
5 Mar, 1223 BC
max: 10:38 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 20)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 56 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 189 km wide. It was seen in north-western Afrca, Turkey, and central Asia. The partial eclipse was visible across most of Africa, Europe, and most of Asia.

This may be the eclipse documented on a clay tablet found in 1948 among the ruins of the ancient city of Ugarit: "On the day of the new moon, in the month of Hiyar, the Sun was put to shame, and went down in the daytime, with Mars in attendance". Another candidate eclipse matching the Ugarit description is the eclipse of 3 May, 1375 BC.
28 May, 0585 BC
max: 14:22 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.08; Saros 57)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 4 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 271 km wide at maximum. It was seen in central America, France, and northern Mediterranean countries. The partial eclipse was visible across the Americas, Europe, north Africa and north-western Asia.

This may be the "Eclipse of Thales", supposedly predicted in advance by Thales of Miletus. If so, it could be the earliest eclipse whose coming was known in advance. However, it not certain that this is the correct eclipse, or even that Thales did in fact make such a prediction. See Wikipedia's article on the subject.
21 Sep, 0024 AD
max: 15:05 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.93; Saros 83)
A small annular eclipse covered only 93% of the Sun in a very broad path, 375 km wide at maximum, and lasted 8 minutes and 5 seconds. It was visible across most of Canada, the north Atlantic, and north-west Africa. The partial eclipse was visible from North America, the north Atlantic, Europe, and western Africa.
6 Feb, 0026 AD
max: 07:35 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 60)
A large annular eclipse covered 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 51 km wide; it lasted 1 minute and 12 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It was seen across north-east Africa, the southern Araban Peninsula, Pakstan, India, China, and Mongolia. The partial eclipse was visible from north-eastern Africa, the Middle East, and most of Europe and Asia.
24 Nov, 0029 AD
max: 09:24 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.02; Saros 62)
The Sun was darkened for 1 minute and 59 seconds by a dramatic total eclipse covering a path up to 109 km wide. This was a sight worth seeing, and was visible across eastern Europe, the Middle East, and south Asia. The partial eclipse was visible from Europe, northern Africa, the Middle East, and south/west Asia.

This is one of several eclipses which have been linked to the crucifixion of Christ; Wikipedia has an article on the subject.
19 Mar, 0033 AD
max: 10:50 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 59)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 6 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 267 km wide at maximum. It was seen from Antarctica south of Africa into the southern Indian ocean. The partial eclipse was visible south and south-western Africa and southern India.

This is one of several eclipses which have been linked to the crucifixion of Christ, although it would not have been visible from Jerusalem; Wikipedia has an article on the subject.
1 Sep, 0034 AD
max: 11:02 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.96; Saros 74)
The Sun was 96% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 4 minutes and 20 seconds and covering a path up to 149 km wide. It was visible across Africa. The partial eclipse was visible from Africa, Europe, and the Middle East.
30 Apr, 0059 AD
max: 12:18 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.02; Saros 68)
The Sun was darkened for 1 minute and 50 seconds by a dramatic total eclipse covering a narrow path at most 68 km wide. This was a sight worth seeing, and was visible in northern South America, north Africa, and the Middle East. The partial eclipse was visible from the eastern Americas, north Africa, Europe, and the Middle East.

This is the eclipse mentioned by Plinius in his annals: "The eclipse of the sun which occurred the day before the calends of May, in the consulship of Vipstanus and Fonteius, not many years ago, was seen in Campania between the seventh and eighth hour of the day; the general Corbulo informs us, that it was seen in Armenia, between the eleventh and twelfth hour".
20 Mar, 0071 AD
max: 09:14 UT
Hybrid Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.01; Saros 79)
A fleeting hybrid eclipse was visible across north Africa and north-west Russia. It covered a narrow path at most 31 km wide and lasted for 35 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. The partial eclipse was visible from most of Africa, Europe, and west Asia.

This is possibly the eclipse mentioned in Plutarch's Moralia XII; see NASA's note on this eclipse. This annular/total/annular eclipse is almost a repeat of the one in year 17.
24 Nov, 0569 AD
max: 06:23 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 90)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 17 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 121 km wide. It was seen in parts of Africa, the Indian Ocean, and Australia. The partial eclipse was visible from the north Atlantic, north Africa, and most of Asia.

This was shortly before the traditional date of the birth of Mohammed; the partial eclipse would have been visible from Makkah (Mecca) at around sunrise.
3 May, 1715 AD
max: 09:36 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 114)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 14 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 295 km wide at maximum. It was seen from a broad swath across England and Wales, Scandinavia, and northern Russia. The partial eclipse was visible across Europe, central Asia, and north-west Africa.

This eclipse (which occurred on 22 April, 1715 in the Old style calendar still in use in the United Kingdom at the time) was predicted in detail by Edmond Halley, and is known as Halley's Eclipse. See Wikipedia's article on the eclipse, and Halley's broadsheet map of the eclipse path.
24 Jun, 1778 AD
max: 15:34 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 52 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 255 km wide at maximum. It was seen from a broad band running across Mexico and up the eastern coast of the US, and in North Africa. The partial eclipse was visible across North America, Europe, and western Africa.

This eclipse was the first total solar eclipse seen in the newly independent USA. Thomas Jefferson noted that clouds prevented viewing of the eclipse in Virginia.
27 Sep, 1791 AD
max: 23:42 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.02; Saros 121)
The Sun was darkened for 1 minute and 38 seconds by a dramatic total eclipse covering a path up to 106 km wide. This was a sight worth seeing, and was visible from south-western and south-eastern Australia. The partial eclipse was visible across Australia and New Zealand.

This eclipse was observed by Captain George Vancouver at Eclipse Island in Western Australia. Although he was not placed to see the total eclipse, he named the island for the spectacle. See Wikipedia's article on the island.
12 Feb, 1831 AD
max: 17:21 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.98; Saros 118)
A large annular eclipse covered 98% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a path up to 100 km wide; it lasted 1 minute and 57 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It was seen across northern Mexico, the eastern USA, and eastern Canada. The partial eclipse was visible from most of North America.

Nat Turner was inspired to begin his slave rebellion by this eclipse, which was seen in Virginia.
22 Jan, 1879 AD
max: 11:53 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 129)
A large annular eclipse covered 97% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a path up to 110 km wide; it lasted 3 minutes and 3 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It was seen across southern South America and southern Africa. The partial eclipse was visible from most of South America, most of Africa, and part of the Middle East.

In the final stages of the Battle of Isandlwana in the Anglo-Zulu war, this eclipse was seen as the Zulu forces overwhelmed the British position. A partial eclipse covering around 55% of the Sun would have been seen from Isandlwana, lasting from 11:10–13:52 UT, with the maximum eclipse at around 12:36 UT.
29 May, 1919 AD
10:33–15:43 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 136)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 51 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 244 km wide at maximum. It was seen from southern Peru/northern Chile, Bolivia, and Brazil; southern Cote d'Ivoire and Liberia; and Gabon, Congo, D.R. Congo, Tanzania, the border with Zambia, and Mozambique. The partial eclipse was visible in most of South America and Africa.

This eclipse was used in a historic test of Einstein's General Relativity by Arthur Eddington and his team. In their observations of the eclipse from Principe and Brazil, they confirmed the bending of starlight by gravity as predicted by Einstein in his general theory of relativity. The results were not completely clear-cut, and were not immediately accepted; follow-up expeditions, such as to the 1922 eclipse, helped to confirm that Eddington's observations were in fact correct. See Wikipedia.
21 Sep, 1922 AD
02:04–07:16 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 59 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 226 km wide. It was seen in the horn of Africa, and across Australia.

This eclipse was used to confirm the observations of the bending of light from the 1919 eclipse, to further prove the correctness of Einstein's General Relativity. See Wikipedia.