Solar Eclipses in Saros Series 121

This page lists all the solar eclipses in saros series 121. The series contains 71 eclipses, occurring over 1262 years.

The following chart shows the paths of the total (in blue), annular (in red), and hybrid (in yellow) solar eclipses in the series which also have mapping data; this is restricted to eclipses between 1900 and 2100, so only a selection of eclipses from the series are shown. Use the zoom controls on the left to zoom in and out; hover over the marker in the middle of an eclipse track to see information on that eclipse. Bear in mind that for each eclipse shown, a partial eclipse is visible over a much wider area.

Note that eclipse dates are specified relative to UT. You have not selected a timezone for eclipse timings, so all times are shown in UT (essentially GMT).
25 Apr, 0944 AD
max: 10:24 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.07; Saros 121)
With only 7% of the Sun covered at maximum eclipse, this was a very marginal eclipse at best, and rather uninteresting.
6 May, 0962 AD
max: 17:45 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.20; Saros 121)
With only 20% of the Sun covered at maximum eclipse, this was a very marginal eclipse at best, and rather uninteresting.
17 May, 0980 AD
max: 01:04 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.33; Saros 121)
A small partial eclipse barely darkened the Sun. With just 33% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this was of limited interest.
28 May, 0998 AD
max: 08:20 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.48; Saros 121)
A small partial eclipse barely darkened the Sun. With just 48% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this was of limited interest.
7 Jun, 1016 AD
max: 15:36 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.62; Saros 121)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 62% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, created an interesting spectacle.
18 Jun, 1034 AD
max: 22:53 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.77; Saros 121)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 77% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, created an interesting spectacle.
29 Jun, 1052 AD
max: 06:12 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.92; Saros 121)
This was a deep partial eclipse, with 92% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This provided a significant spectacle for those who saw it.
10 Jul, 1070 AD
max: 13:34 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 5 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 636 km wide at maximum.
20 Jul, 1088 AD
max: 21:01 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 36 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 356 km wide at maximum.
1 Aug, 1106 AD
max: 04:34 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes exactly at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 292 km wide at maximum.
11 Aug, 1124 AD
max: 12:12 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 19 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 259 km wide at maximum.
22 Aug, 1142 AD
max: 19:58 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 36 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 238 km wide.
2 Sep, 1160 AD
max: 03:53 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 49 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 222 km wide.
13 Sep, 1178 AD
max: 11:55 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 59 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 210 km wide.
23 Sep, 1196 AD
max: 20:06 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 6 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 199 km wide.
5 Oct, 1214 AD
max: 04:25 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 11 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 190 km wide.
15 Oct, 1232 AD
max: 12:53 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 14 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 183 km wide.
26 Oct, 1250 AD
max: 21:27 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 16 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 177 km wide.
6 Nov, 1268 AD
max: 06:09 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 16 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 172 km wide.
17 Nov, 1286 AD
max: 14:54 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 17 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 168 km wide.
27 Nov, 1304 AD
max: 23:45 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 17 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 167 km wide.
9 Dec, 1322 AD
max: 08:37 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 17 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 167 km wide.
19 Dec, 1340 AD
max: 17:31 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 17 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 168 km wide.
31 Dec, 1358 AD
max: 02:23 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 18 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 171 km wide.
10 Jan, 1377 AD
max: 11:13 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 19 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 175 km wide.
21 Jan, 1395 AD
max: 19:59 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 21 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 180 km wide.
1 Feb, 1413 AD
max: 04:42 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 25 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 187 km wide.
12 Feb, 1431 AD
max: 13:17 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 30 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 193 km wide.
22 Feb, 1449 AD
max: 21:45 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 36 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 200 km wide.
6 Mar, 1467 AD
max: 06:06 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 44 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 207 km wide.
16 Mar, 1485 AD
max: 14:20 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 53 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 213 km wide.
27 Mar, 1503 AD
max: 22:25 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 4 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 218 km wide.
7 Apr, 1521 AD
max: 06:23 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 15 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 222 km wide.
18 Apr, 1539 AD
max: 14:12 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 28 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 225 km wide.
28 Apr, 1557 AD
max: 21:56 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 42 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 227 km wide.
10 May, 1575 AD
max: 05:32 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 56 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 227 km wide.
30 May, 1593 AD
max: 13:05 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 8 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 227 km wide.
10 Jun, 1611 AD
max: 20:32 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 16 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 224 km wide.
21 Jun, 1629 AD
max: 03:58 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 20 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 221 km wide.
2 Jul, 1647 AD
max: 11:20 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 15 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 217 km wide.
12 Jul, 1665 AD
max: 18:43 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 2 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 211 km wide.
24 Jul, 1683 AD
max: 02:06 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 38 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 203 km wide.
4 Aug, 1701 AD
max: 09:31 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 6 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 193 km wide.
15 Aug, 1719 AD
max: 16:59 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 27 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 181 km wide.
26 Aug, 1737 AD
max: 00:31 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 44 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 167 km wide.
6 Sep, 1755 AD
max: 08:09 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.03; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes exactly at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 150 km wide.
16 Sep, 1773 AD
max: 15:52 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.03; Saros 121)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 18 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 130 km wide.
27 Sep, 1791 AD
max: 23:42 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.02; Saros 121)
The Sun was darkened for 1 minute and 38 seconds by a dramatic total eclipse covering a path up to 106 km wide. This was a sight worth seeing, and was visible from south-western and south-eastern Australia. The partial eclipse was visible across Australia and New Zealand.
9 Oct, 1809 AD
max: 07:38 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.01; Saros 121)
The Sun was darkened for 1 minute and 2 seconds by a dramatic total eclipse covering a narrow path at most 77 km wide. This was a sight worth seeing.
20 Oct, 1827 AD
max: 15:41 UT
Hybrid Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.01; Saros 121)
A fleeting hybrid eclipse covered a narrow path at most 43 km wide and lasted for 30 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
30 Oct, 1845 AD
max: 23:51 UT
Hybrid Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.00; Saros 121)
A fleeting hybrid eclipse covered only a tiny path, just 3 km wide and lasted for a very brief 2 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
11 Nov, 1863 AD
max: 08:08 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 121)
A large annular eclipse covered over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 42 km wide; it lasted just 22 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
21 Nov, 1881 AD
max: 16:31 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 121)
A large annular eclipse covered 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a path up to 90 km wide; it lasted 43 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
3 Dec, 1899 AD
max: 00:57 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.98; Saros 121)
A large annular eclipse covered 98% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a path up to 140 km wide; it lasted 1 minute and 1 second at the point of maximum eclipse.
14 Dec, 1917 AD
max: 09:27 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.98; Saros 121)
A large annular eclipse covered 98% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 189 km wide; it lasted 1 minute and 17 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
25 Dec, 1935 AD
max: 17:59 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.98; Saros 121)
A large annular eclipse covered 98% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 234 km wide; it lasted 1 minute and 30 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
5 Jan, 1954 AD
max: 02:31 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 121)
A large annular eclipse covered 97% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 278 km wide at maximum; it lasted 1 minute and 42 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
16 Jan, 1972 AD
max: 11:02 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 121)
The Sun was 97% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 1 minute and 53 seconds and covering a very broad path, 321 km wide at maximum.
26 Jan, 1990 AD
max: 19:30 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 121)
The Sun was 97% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 2 minutes and 3 seconds and covering a very broad path, 373 km wide at maximum.
7 Feb, 2008 AD
01:38–06:11 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 121)
The Sun was 97% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 2 minutes and 12 seconds and covering a very broad path, 444 km wide at maximum. It was visible from Antarctica and the extreme south Pacific.
17 Feb, 2026 AD
09:56–14:27 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.96; Saros 121)
The Sun will be 96% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 2 minutes and 20 seconds and covering a very broad path, 616 km wide at maximum. It will be visible from a small region in Antarctica. The partial eclipse will be visible over Antarctica and south-eastern Africa.
28 Feb, 2044 AD
max: 20:23 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.96; Saros 121)
This marginal annular eclipse will last 2 minutes and 27 seconds, with the annular path covering a small area in the south polar regions.
11 Mar, 2062 AD
max: 04:24 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.93; Saros 121)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 93% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it.
21 Mar, 2080 AD
max: 12:17 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.87; Saros 121)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 87% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it.
1 Apr, 2098 AD
max: 19:59 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.80; Saros 121)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 80% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle.
13 Apr, 2116 AD
max: 03:32 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.71; Saros 121)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 71% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle.
24 Apr, 2134 AD
max: 10:55 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.61; Saros 121)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 61% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle.
4 May, 2152 AD
max: 18:08 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.50; Saros 121)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 50% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle.
16 May, 2170 AD
max: 01:12 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.38; Saros 121)
A small partial eclipse will barely darken the Sun. With just 38% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this will be of limited interest.
26 May, 2188 AD
max: 08:08 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.25; Saros 121)
A small partial eclipse will barely darken the Sun. With just 25% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this will be of limited interest.
7 Jun, 2206 AD
max: 14:58 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.12; Saros 121)
With only 12% of the Sun covered at maximum eclipse, this will be a very marginal eclipse at best, and rather uninteresting.