A partial eclipse of the Sun occurred on 16 March, 1504 UT Old Style, with maximum eclipse at 13:26 UT. This was a deep partial eclipse, with 93% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This provided a significant spectacle for those who saw it.

Maximum eclipse was at 13:26:58 UT.

During this eclipse the Sun was 0.533° in apparent diameter, around average. The Moon was just 3 days before perigee, making it relatively large. At maximum eclipse it was 0.537° in apparent diameter, which is 1.0% larger than average. This has no real effect on this eclipse, since the Moon's central shadow misses the Earth, making this a partial eclipse. The statistics page has information on the ranges of the sizes of the Sun and Moon.

Overview Map

This map sourced from NASA Goddard Space flight Center: GSFC Eclipse Web SiteGSFC Eclipse Web Site
The primary source of all the information on eclipses presented here at Hermit Eclipse. [NASA Goddard Space flight Center]
https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse.html
shows the visibility of the partial solar eclipse. (Click on it for the full-sized version.)

Eclipse Season and Saros Series

This eclipse season contains 2 eclipses:

This was the 22nd eclipse in solar Saros series 131.The surrounding eclipses in this Saros series are:

Eclipse Parameters

UT Date/time (max) 13:26:58 on 16 Mar UT TDT Date/time (max) 13:30:09 on 16 Mar TDT
Saros Series 131 Number in Series 21
Penumbral Magnitiude Central Magnitiude 0.9348
Gamma 1.0345 Path Width (km) 0
Delta T 3m11s Error ± 0m39s (95%)
Penumbral Duration Partial Duration
Total Duration
Partial Rating Total Rating
Sun Distance 149602488 km (51.9%) Moon Distance 371003 km (29.0%)
Sun Diameter 0.533° Moon Diameter 0.537° - 0.537°
Apogee 16:49 on 7 Mar UT Perigee 12:56 on 19 Mar UT

Note that while all dates and times on this site (except where noted) are in UT, which is within a second of civil time, the dates and times shown in NASA's eclipse listingsGSFC Eclipse Web Site
The primary source of all the information on eclipses presented here at Hermit Eclipse. [NASA Goddard Space flight Center]
https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse.html
are in the TDT timescale.

The Sun and Moon distances are shown in km, and as a percentage of their minimum - maximum distances; hence 0% is the closest possible (Earth's perihelion, or the Moon's closest possible perigee) and 100% is the farthest (aphelion, the farthest apogee). The statistics page has information on the ranges of sizes of the Sun and Moon.

Data last updated: 2015-06-21 22:11:45 UTC.