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Saros Series of Lunar Eclipses

Lunar Eclipses in Saros Series 125

This page lists all the lunar eclipses in saros series 125. The series contains 72 eclipses, occurring over 1280 years.

The following chart shows the position where the Moon is directly overhead at the maximum times of the total (in blue) and partial (in red) lunar eclipses (penumbral eclipses are omitted). Each eclipse will be visible approximately from the half of the Earth centred on that point. Note that we only have mapping data for eclipses from year 1 AD, so any eclipses prior to that date will be missing. Use the zoom controls on the left to zoom in and out; hover over a marker to see the area of visibility and summary information on that eclipse.

Note that eclipse dates are specified relative to UT.
You have not selected a timezone for eclipse timings.
17 Jul, 1163 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.09; Saros 125)
In this extremely marginal eclipse, the Moon barely clipped the edge of the Earth's penumbral shadow. This caused a microscopic darkening of just 9% of the Moon's disc for 1 hour and 20 minutes, which was essentially impossible to see.
27 Jul, 1181 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.21; Saros 125)
This very subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse was essentially invisible to the naked eye; though it lasted 2 hours and 4 minutes, just 21% of the Moon's disc was in partial shadow (with no part of it in complete shadow).
8 Aug, 1199 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.33; Saros 125)
This very subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse was essentially invisible to the naked eye; though it lasted 2 hours and 33 minutes, just 33% of the Moon's disc was in partial shadow (with no part of it in complete shadow).
18 Aug, 1217 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.44; Saros 125)
This very subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse was essentially invisible to the naked eye; though it lasted 2 hours and 54 minutes, just 44% of the Moon's disc was in partial shadow (with no part of it in complete shadow).
29 Aug, 1235 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.54; Saros 125)
This very subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse was essentially invisible to the naked eye; though it lasted 3 hours and 10 minutes, just 54% of the Moon's disc was in partial shadow (with no part of it in complete shadow).
9 Sep, 1253 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.63; Saros 125)
This subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse may have been visible to a skilled observer at maximum eclipse. 63% of the Moon's disc was partially shaded by the Earth (none of it was in total shadow), which caused a gentle shadow gradient across its disc at maximum; the eclipse as a whole lasted 3 hours and 23 minutes.
20 Sep, 1271 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.71; Saros 125)
This subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse may have been visible to a skilled observer at maximum eclipse. 71% of the Moon's disc was partially shaded by the Earth (none of it was in total shadow), which caused a gentle shadow gradient across its disc at maximum; the eclipse as a whole lasted 3 hours and 33 minutes.
30 Sep, 1289 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.77; Saros 125)
This subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse may have been visible to a skilled observer at maximum eclipse. 77% of the Moon's disc was partially shaded by the Earth (none of it was in total shadow), which caused a gentle shadow gradient across its disc at maximum; the eclipse as a whole lasted 3 hours and 41 minutes.
12 Oct, 1307 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.82; Saros 125)
At maximum eclipse, 82% of the Moon's disc was partially shaded by the Earth, which caused a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may have been visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon was in complete shadow. The eclipse lasted 3 hours and 46 minutes overall.
22 Oct, 1325 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.86; Saros 125)
At maximum eclipse, 86% of the Moon's disc was partially shaded by the Earth, which caused a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may have been visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon was in complete shadow. The eclipse lasted 3 hours and 51 minutes overall.
2 Nov, 1343 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.89; Saros 125)
At maximum eclipse, 89% of the Moon's disc was partially shaded by the Earth, which caused a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may have been visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon was in complete shadow. The eclipse lasted 3 hours and 54 minutes overall.
13 Nov, 1361 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.91; Saros 125)
At maximum eclipse, 91% of the Moon's disc was partially shaded by the Earth, which caused a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may have been visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon was in complete shadow. The eclipse lasted 3 hours and 56 minutes overall.
24 Nov, 1379 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.93; Saros 125)
The Moon approached within 5% of the Earth's umbral shadow at maximum eclipse, with the overall eclipse lasting 3 hours and 57 minutes. While less dramatic than a partial eclipse (as no part of the Moon was in complete shadow), a shading across the Moon should have been readily visible to observers.
4 Dec, 1397 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.94; Saros 125)
The Moon approached within 4% of the Earth's umbral shadow at maximum eclipse, with the overall eclipse lasting 3 hours and 58 minutes. While less dramatic than a partial eclipse (as no part of the Moon was in complete shadow), a shading across the Moon should have been readily visible to observers.
16 Dec, 1415 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.94; Saros 125)
The Moon approached within 3% of the Earth's umbral shadow at maximum eclipse, with the overall eclipse lasting 3 hours and 58 minutes. While less dramatic than a partial eclipse (as no part of the Moon was in complete shadow), a shading across the Moon should have been readily visible to observers.
26 Dec, 1433 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.95; Saros 125)
The Moon approached within 2% of the Earth's umbral shadow at maximum eclipse, with the overall eclipse lasting 3 hours and 59 minutes. While less dramatic than a partial eclipse (as no part of the Moon was in complete shadow), a shading across the Moon should have been readily visible to observers.
7 Jan, 1452 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.96; Saros 125)
The Moon approached within 1% of the Earth's umbral shadow at maximum eclipse, with the overall eclipse lasting 3 hours and 59 minutes. While less dramatic than a partial eclipse (as no part of the Moon was in complete shadow), a shading across the Moon should have been readily visible to observers.
17 Jan, 1470 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.00; Saros 125)
While technically a partial eclipse, the Moon barely clipped the Earth's umbral shadow, which may have been very difficult to observe in practice; though a shading across the moon from the Earth's penumbral shadow should have been visible at maximum eclipse. The partial eclipse lasted for 11 minutes and 54 seconds.
28 Jan, 1488 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.02; Saros 125)
A tiny bite out of the Moon may have been visible at maximum, though just 2% of the Moon was shadowed in a partial eclipse which lasted for 33 minutes and 47 seconds. A shading across the moon from the Earth's penumbral shadow should have been visible at maximum eclipse.
8 Feb, 1506 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.05; Saros 125)
A tiny bite out of the Moon may have been visible at maximum, though just 5% of the Moon was shadowed in a partial eclipse which lasted for 49 minutes and 48 seconds. A shading across the moon from the Earth's penumbral shadow should have been visible at maximum eclipse.
19 Feb, 1524 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.09; Saros 125)
A tiny bite out of the Moon may have been visible at maximum, though just 9% of the Moon was shadowed in a partial eclipse which lasted for 1 hour and 6 minutes. A shading across the moon from the Earth's penumbral shadow should have been visible at maximum eclipse.
1 Mar, 1542 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.14; Saros 125)
At maximum eclipse, a small bite out of the Moon should have been visible. The eclipse lasted for 1 hour and 21 minutes, with just 14% of the Moon in shadow at maximum.
12 Mar, 1560 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.20; Saros 125)
The Earth's shadow on the moon was clearly visible in this eclipse, with 20% of the Moon in shadow; the partial eclipse lasted for 1 hour and 36 minutes.
23 Mar, 1578 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.28; Saros 125)
The Earth's shadow on the moon was clearly visible in this eclipse, with 28% of the Moon in shadow; the partial eclipse lasted for 1 hour and 50 minutes.
12 Apr, 1596 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.36; Saros 125)
The Earth's shadow on the moon was clearly visible in this eclipse, with 36% of the Moon in shadow; the partial eclipse lasted for 2 hours and 5 minutes.
24 Apr, 1614 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.46; Saros 125)
The Earth's shadow on the moon was clearly visible in this eclipse, with 46% of the Moon in shadow; the partial eclipse lasted for 2 hours and 18 minutes.
4 May, 1632 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.56; Saros 125)
The Earth's shadow on the moon was clearly visible in this eclipse, with 56% of the Moon in shadow; the partial eclipse lasted for 2 hours and 31 minutes.
15 May, 1650 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.68; Saros 125)
The Moon was strikingly shadowed in this deep partial eclipse which lasted 2 hours and 43 minutes, with 68% of the Moon in darkness at maximum.
26 May, 1668 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.80; Saros 125)
The Moon was strikingly shadowed in this deep partial eclipse which lasted 2 hours and 54 minutes, with 80% of the Moon in darkness at maximum.
6 Jun, 1686 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.93; Saros 125)
The Moon was almost covered by the Earth's shadow in a very deep partial eclipse, which lasted 3 hours and 3 minutes. With 93% of the Moon in shadow at maximum eclipse, this was quite a memorable event.
17 Jun, 1704 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 125)
A shallow total eclipse saw the Moon in relative darkness for 35 minutes and 42 seconds. The Moon was 6% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should have been significantly darkened. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 12 minutes in total.
29 Jun, 1722 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.19; Saros 125)
A shallow total eclipse saw the Moon in relative darkness for 1 hour and 3 minutes. The Moon was 19% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should have been significantly darkened. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 19 minutes in total.
9 Jul, 1740 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.33; Saros 125)
The Moon was plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 18 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which saw the Moon 33% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may have been stained a deep red colour. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 25 minutes in total.
20 Jul, 1758 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.46; Saros 125)
The Moon was plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 28 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which saw the Moon 46% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may have been stained a deep red colour. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 29 minutes in total.
31 Jul, 1776 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.59; Saros 125)
The Moon was plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 35 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which saw the Moon 59% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may have been stained a deep red colour. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 32 minutes in total.
11 Aug, 1794 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.72; Saros 125)
A dramatic total eclipse lasting 1 hour and 39 minutes plunged the full Moon into deep darkness, as it passed right through the centre of the Earth's umbral shadow. While the visual effect of a total eclipse is variable, the Moon may have been stained a deep orange or red colour at maximum eclipse. This was a great spectacle for everyone who saw it. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 34 minutes in total.
22 Aug, 1812 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.83; Saros 125)
A dramatic total eclipse lasting 1 hour and 40 minutes plunged the full Moon into deep darkness, as it passed right through the centre of the Earth's umbral shadow. While the visual effect of a total eclipse is variable, the Moon may have been stained a deep orange or red colour at maximum eclipse. This was a great spectacle for everyone who saw it. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 35 minutes in total.
2 Sep, 1830 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.80; Saros 125)
A dramatic total eclipse lasting 1 hour and 40 minutes plunged the full Moon into deep darkness, as it passed right through the centre of the Earth's umbral shadow. While the visual effect of a total eclipse is variable, the Moon may have been stained a deep orange or red colour at maximum eclipse. This was a great spectacle for everyone who saw it. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 36 minutes in total.
13 Sep, 1848 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.70; Saros 125)
A dramatic total eclipse lasting 1 hour and 39 minutes plunged the full Moon into deep darkness, as it passed right through the centre of the Earth's umbral shadow. While the visual effect of a total eclipse is variable, the Moon may have been stained a deep orange or red colour at maximum eclipse. This was a great spectacle for everyone who saw it. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 35 minutes in total.
24 Sep, 1866 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.61; Saros 125)
A dramatic total eclipse lasting 1 hour and 36 minutes plunged the full Moon into deep darkness, as it passed right through the centre of the Earth's umbral shadow. While the visual effect of a total eclipse is variable, the Moon may have been stained a deep orange or red colour at maximum eclipse. This was a great spectacle for everyone who saw it. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 35 minutes in total.
4 Oct, 1884 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.53; Saros 125)
The Moon was plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 33 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which saw the Moon 53% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may have been stained a deep red colour. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 34 minutes in total.
17 Oct, 1902 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.46; Saros 125)
The Moon was plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 29 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which saw the Moon 46% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may have been stained a deep red colour. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 32 minutes in total.
27 Oct, 1920 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.40; Saros 125)
The Moon was plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 25 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which saw the Moon 40% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may have been stained a deep red colour. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 31 minutes in total.
7 Nov, 1938 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.35; Saros 125)
The Moon was plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 21 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which saw the Moon 35% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may have been stained a deep red colour. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 30 minutes in total.
18 Nov, 1956 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.32; Saros 125)
The Moon was plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 18 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which saw the Moon 32% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may have been stained a deep red colour. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 30 minutes in total.
29 Nov, 1974 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.29; Saros 125)
The Moon was plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 16 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which saw the Moon 29% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may have been stained a deep red colour. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 29 minutes in total.
9 Dec, 1992 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.27; Saros 125)
The Moon was plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 14 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which saw the Moon 27% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may have been stained a deep red colour. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 29 minutes in total.
21 Dec, 2010 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.26; Saros 125)
The Moon was plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 12 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which saw the Moon 26% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may have been stained a deep red colour for observers over eastern Asia, Australasia, northwestern Europe and Africa, and the Americas. The partial eclipse lasted for 3 hours and 29 minutes in total.
31 Dec, 2028 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.25; Saros 125)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 11 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 25% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers in north-east Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia, north-western Canada, and Alaska. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 29 minutes in total.
12 Jan, 2047 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.23; Saros 125)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 10 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 23% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 29 minutes in total.
22 Jan, 2065 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.22; Saros 125)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 9 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 22% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 29 minutes in total.
2 Feb, 2083 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.21; Saros 125)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 7 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 21% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 29 minutes in total.
14 Feb, 2101 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.18; Saros 125)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 1 hour and 3 minutes. The Moon will be 18% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 28 minutes in total.
25 Feb, 2119 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.15; Saros 125)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 58 minutes and 6 seconds. The Moon will be 15% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 27 minutes in total.
7 Mar, 2137 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.11; Saros 125)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 50 minutes exactly. The Moon will be 11% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 26 minutes in total.
19 Mar, 2155 AD
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 125)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 35 minutes and 30 seconds. The Moon will be 5% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 23 minutes in total.
29 Mar, 2173 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.98; Saros 125)
The Moon will be almost covered by the Earth's shadow in a very deep partial eclipse, lasting 3 hours and 20 minutes. With 98% of the Moon in shadow at maximum eclipse, this will be quite a memorable event.
9 Apr, 2191 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.90; Saros 125)
The Moon will be almost covered by the Earth's shadow in a very deep partial eclipse, lasting 3 hours and 15 minutes. With 90% of the Moon in shadow at maximum eclipse, this will be quite a memorable event.
21 Apr, 2209 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.81; Saros 125)
The Moon will be strikingly shadowed in this deep partial eclipse lasting 3 hours and 8 minutes, with 81% of the Moon in darkness at maximum.
2 May, 2227 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.70; Saros 125)
The Moon will be strikingly shadowed in this deep partial eclipse lasting 2 hours and 59 minutes, with 70% of the Moon in darkness at maximum.
12 May, 2245 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.58; Saros 125)
The Earth's shadow on the moon will be clearly visible in this eclipse, with 58% of the Moon in shadow; the partial eclipse will last for 2 hours and 47 minutes.
23 May, 2263 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.45; Saros 125)
The Earth's shadow on the moon will be clearly visible in this eclipse, with 45% of the Moon in shadow; the partial eclipse will last for 2 hours and 30 minutes.
3 Jun, 2281 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.31; Saros 125)
The Earth's shadow on the moon will be clearly visible in this eclipse, with 31% of the Moon in shadow; the partial eclipse will last for 2 hours and 8 minutes.
14 Jun, 2299 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.16; Saros 125)
At maximum eclipse, a small bite out of the Moon should be visible. The eclipse will last for 1 hour and 35 minutes, with just 16% of the Moon in shadow at maximum.
25 Jun, 2317 AD
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.01; Saros 125)
While technically a partial eclipse, the Moon barely clips the Earth's umbral shadow, which may be very difficult to observe in practice; though a shading across the moon from the Earth's penumbral shadow should be visible at maximum eclipse. The partial eclipse will last for 23 minutes and 42 seconds.
7 Jul, 2335 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.90; Saros 125)
At maximum eclipse, 90% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth, which will cause a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may be visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon will be in complete shadow. The eclipse will last 4 hours and 24 minutes overall.
17 Jul, 2353 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.74; Saros 125)
This subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse may be visible to a skilled observer at maximum eclipse. 74% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth (none of it will be in total shadow), which will cause a gentle shadow gradient across its disc at maximum; the eclipse as a whole will last 4 hours and 5 minutes.
28 Jul, 2371 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.59; Saros 125)
This very subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse will be essentially invisible to the naked eye; though it will last 3 hours and 42 minutes, just 59% of the Moon's disc will be in partial shadow (with no part of it in complete shadow).
7 Aug, 2389 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.44; Saros 125)
This very subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse will be essentially invisible to the naked eye; though it will last 3 hours and 15 minutes, just 44% of the Moon's disc will be in partial shadow (with no part of it in complete shadow).
19 Aug, 2407 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.29; Saros 125)
This very subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse will be essentially invisible to the naked eye; though it will last 2 hours and 42 minutes, just 29% of the Moon's disc will be in partial shadow (with no part of it in complete shadow).
29 Aug, 2425 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.16; Saros 125)
In this extremely marginal eclipse, the Moon barely clips the edge of the Earth's penumbral shadow. This will cause a microscopic darkening of just 16% of the Moon's disc for 2 hours exactly, which will be essentially impossible to see.
9 Sep, 2443 AD
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.03; Saros 125)
In this extremely marginal eclipse, the Moon barely clips the edge of the Earth's penumbral shadow. This will cause a microscopic darkening of just 3% of the Moon's disc for 51 minutes and 42 seconds, which will be essentially impossible to see.