This page contains a summary of all eclipses of the Moon occurring in the recent past and near future. Each eclipse has a link to a page providing full details, including maps of the visibility of the eclipse.

This site has data on every eclipse from 2000 BC to 3000 AD. If you would like to browse all the eclipses, go to the full lunar eclipse catalog; or you can search the entire database.

For every eclipse, I've shown its date, magnitude, and Saros series number. The magnitude represents the fraction of the Moon's disc that is obscured by the Earth's umbral shadow; this will always be 1.00 or more for a total eclipse, and for a partial eclipse shows how much of the Moon's face will be in shadow.

You can click on the date of any eclipse to go to a page of details, including maps, for that eclipse.

You might also want to look at my eclipse statistics page, and the full catalog of 5,000 years of solar and lunar eclipses.

Lunar Eclipses in the Next 20 Years

The following chart shows the position where the Moon is directly overhead at the maximum times of the total (in blue) and partial (in red) lunar eclipses (penumbral eclipses are omitted). Each eclipse will be visible approximately from the half of the Earth centred on that point. Use the zoom controls on the left to zoom in and out; hover over a marker to see the area of visibility and summary information on that eclipse.

Note that eclipse dates are specified relative to UT. You have not selected a timezone for eclipse timings, so all times are shown in UT (essentially GMT).
11 Feb, 2017 AD
22:34 on 10 Feb–02:53 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.99; Saros 114)
The Moon approached within 4% of the Earth's umbral shadow at maximum eclipse; 99% of the Moon's disc was partially shaded by the Earth, with the overall eclipse lasting 4 hours and 19 minutes. While less dramatic than a partial eclipse (as no part of the Moon was in complete shadow), a shading across the Moon should have been readily visible to observers from the Americas, Europe, Africa, and most of Asia.
7 Aug, 2017 AD
15:50–20:50 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.25; Saros 119)
The Earth's shadow on the moon was clearly visible in this eclipse, with 25% of the Moon in shadow; the partial eclipse lasted for 1 hour and 55 minutes and was visible from Europe, Africa, most of Asia, and Australia.
31 Jan, 2018 AD
10:51–16:08 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.32; Saros 124)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 16 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 32% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers from Asia, Australia, and North America. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 23 minutes in total.
27 Jul, 2018 AD
17:14–23:28 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.61; Saros 129)
A dramatic total eclipse lasting 1 hour and 43 minutes will plunge the full Moon into deep darkness, as it passes right through the centre of the Earth's umbral shadow. While the visual effect of a total eclipse is variable, the Moon may be stained a deep orange or red colour at maximum eclipse. This will be a great spectacle for everyone who sees it from Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 55 minutes in total.
21 Jan, 2019 AD
02:36–07:48 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.20; Saros 134)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 1 hour and 2 minutes. The Moon will be 20% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened for viewers from the Americas, Europe, and most of Africa. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 17 minutes in total.
16 Jul, 2019 AD
18:43 on 16 Jul–00:17 on 17 Jul UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.65; Saros 139)
The Moon will be strikingly shadowed in this deep partial eclipse lasting 2 hours and 58 minutes, with 65% of the Moon in darkness at maximum. The eclipse will be visible from South America, Europe, Africa, south Asia, and Australia.
10 Jan, 2020 AD
17:07–21:12 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.90; Saros 144)
At maximum eclipse, 90% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth, which will cause a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may be visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon will be in complete shadow. The eclipse will last 4 hours and 5 minutes overall, and will be visible from Africa, Europe, Asia, Alaska, and Australia.
5 Jun, 2020 AD
17:45–21:04 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.57; Saros 111)
This very subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse will be essentially invisible to the naked eye; though it will last 3 hours and 18 minutes, just 57% of the Moon's disc will be in partial shadow (with no part of it in complete shadow). The full Moon itself will be visible from southern Europe, Africa, south Asia, and Australia.
5 Jul, 2020 AD
03:07–05:52 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.35; Saros 149)
This very subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse will be essentially invisible to the naked eye; though it will last 2 hours and 45 minutes, just 35% of the Moon's disc will be in partial shadow (with no part of it in complete shadow). The full Moon itself will be visible from the Americas, south-west Europe, and western Africa.
30 Nov, 2020 AD
07:32–11:53 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.83; Saros 116)
This subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse may be visible to a skilled observer at maximum eclipse. 83% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth (none of it will be in total shadow), which will cause a gentle shadow gradient across its disc at maximum; the eclipse as a whole will last 4 hours and 21 minutes. The Moon will be visible from east Asia, Australia, and the Americas.
26 May, 2021 AD
08:47–13:49 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.01; Saros 121)
The Moon will barely edge into total eclipse for just 14 minutes and 30 seconds. With the Moon just barely inside the Earth's umbral shadow, the Moon may be quite bright, but even so, this should be worth seeing for observers from the western Americas, the Pacific, Australia, and south-east Asia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 7 minutes in total.
19 Nov, 2021 AD
06:02–12:03 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 126)
The Moon will be almost covered by the Earth's shadow in a very deep partial eclipse, lasting 3 hours and 28 minutes and visible in east Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and the Americas. With 97% of the Moon in shadow at maximum eclipse, this will be quite a memorable event.
16 May, 2022 AD
01:32–06:50 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.41; Saros 131)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 25 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 41% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers in the Americas, western Europe, and most of Africa. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 27 minutes in total.
8 Nov, 2022 AD
08:02–13:56 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.36; Saros 136)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 25 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 36% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers from most of Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and North and Central America. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 40 minutes in total.
5 May, 2023 AD
15:14–19:31 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.96; Saros 141)
The Moon will approach within 5% of the Earth's umbral shadow at maximum eclipse; 96% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth, with the overall eclipse lasting 4 hours and 18 minutes. While less dramatic than a partial eclipse (as no part of the Moon will be in complete shadow), a shading across the Moon should be readily visible to observers from most of Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia.
28 Oct, 2023 AD
18:01–22:26 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.12; Saros 146)
At maximum eclipse, a small bite out of the Moon should be visible from most of Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia. The eclipse will last for 1 hour and 17 minutes, with just 12% of the Moon in shadow at maximum.
25 Mar, 2024 AD
04:53–09:32 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.96; Saros 113)
At maximum eclipse, 96% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth, which will cause a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may be visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon will be in complete shadow. The eclipse will last 4 hours and 39 minutes overall, and will be visible from far eastern Asia and Australia, the Americas, and western Europe and Africa.
18 Sep, 2024 AD
00:41–04:47 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.08; Saros 118)
A tiny bite out of the Moon may be visible at maximum, though just 8% of the Moon will be shadowed in a partial eclipse lasting for 1 hour and 3 minutes and visible across the Americas, Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. A shading across the moon from the Earth's penumbral shadow should be visible at maximum eclipse.
14 Mar, 2025 AD
03:57–10:00 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.18; Saros 123)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 1 hour and 5 minutes. The Moon will be 18% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened for viewers from the Americas and extreme western Africa. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 38 minutes in total.
7 Sep, 2025 AD
15:28–20:55 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.36; Saros 128)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 22 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 36% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers in most of Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 29 minutes in total.
3 Mar, 2026 AD
08:44–14:22 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.15; Saros 133)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 58 minutes and 18 seconds. The Moon will be 15% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened for viewers in east Asia, Australia, North America, and Central America. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 27 minutes in total.
28 Aug, 2026 AD
01:23–07:01 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.93; Saros 138)
The Moon will be almost covered by the Earth's shadow in a very deep partial eclipse, lasting 3 hours and 18 minutes and visible from the Americas and western Europe and Africa. With 93% of the Moon in shadow at maximum eclipse, this will be quite a memorable event.
20 Feb, 2027 AD
21:12 on 20 Feb–01:13 on 21 Feb UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.93; Saros 143)
At maximum eclipse, 93% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth, which will cause a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may be visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon will be in complete shadow. The eclipse will last 4 hours and 1 minute overall, and will be visible from the eastern Americas, Europe, Africa, and most of Asia.
18 Jul, 2027 AD
15:56–16:08 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.00; Saros 110)
In this virtually non-existant eclipse, the Moon barely clips the edge of the Earth's penumbral shadow; although the eclipse will last 11 minutes and 48 seconds, it will be impossible to see in practice. The full Moon itself will be visible from south-eastern Africa, south Asia, and Australia, and of course will be a lovely sight as always.
17 Aug, 2027 AD
05:24–09:03 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.55; Saros 148)
This very subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse will be essentially invisible to the naked eye; though it will last 3 hours and 39 minutes, just 55% of the Moon's disc will be in partial shadow (with no part of it in complete shadow). The full Moon itself will be visible from eastern Australia and New Zealand, the Americas, and far western Africa.
12 Jan, 2028 AD
02:07–06:18 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.07; Saros 115)
A tiny bite out of the Moon may be visible at maximum, though just 7% of the Moon will be shadowed in a partial eclipse lasting for 56 minutes exactly and visible in the Americas, Europe, and most of Africa. A shading across the moon from the Earth's penumbral shadow should be visible at maximum eclipse.
6 Jul, 2028 AD
15:44–20:54 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.39; Saros 120)
The Earth's shadow on the moon will be clearly visible in this eclipse, with 39% of the Moon in shadow; the partial eclipse will last for 2 hours and 22 minutes and will be visible from most of Africa, south and east Europe, Asia, and Australia.
31 Dec, 2028 AD
14:03–19:40 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.25; Saros 125)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 11 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 25% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers in north-east Africa, Europe, Asia, Australia, north-western Canada, and Alaska. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 29 minutes in total.
26 Jun, 2029 AD
00:34–06:09 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.84; Saros 130)
A dramatic total eclipse lasting 1 hour and 42 minutes will plunge the full Moon into deep darkness, as it passes right through the centre of the Earth's umbral shadow. While the visual effect of a total eclipse is variable, the Moon may be stained a deep orange or red colour at maximum eclipse. This will be a great spectacle for everyone who sees it from most of the Americas and western Europe and Africa. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 40 minutes in total.
20 Dec, 2029 AD
19:42 on 20 Dec–01:40 on 21 Dec UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.12; Saros 135)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 53 minutes and 42 seconds. The Moon will be 12% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened for viewers in eastern North and South America, all of Europe, Africa, and the Middle East, and most of Asia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 33 minutes in total.
15 Jun, 2030 AD
16:14–20:52 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.50; Saros 140)
The Earth's shadow on the moon will be clearly visible in this eclipse, with 50% of the Moon in shadow; the partial eclipse will last for 2 hours and 24 minutes and will be visible from most of Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia.
9 Dec, 2030 AD
20:07 on 9 Dec–00:47 on 10 Dec UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.94; Saros 145)
This subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse may be visible to a skilled observer at maximum eclipse. 94% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth (none of it will be in total shadow), which will cause a gentle shadow gradient across its disc at maximum; the eclipse as a whole will last 4 hours and 39 minutes. The Moon will be visible from the Americas, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and most of Asia.
7 May, 2031 AD
01:52–05:49 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.88; Saros 112)
At maximum eclipse, 88% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth, which will cause a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may be visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon will be in complete shadow. The eclipse will last 3 hours and 57 minutes overall, and will be visible in the Americas and western Europe and Africa.
5 Jun, 2031 AD
10:56–12:31 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.13; Saros 150)
In this extremely marginal eclipse, the Moon barely clips the edge of the Earth's penumbral shadow. This will cause a microscopic darkening of just 13% of the Moon's disc for 1 hour and 36 minutes, which will be essentially impossible to see. The full Moon itself will be visible from east Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and the western Americas, and of course will be a lovely sight as always.
30 Oct, 2031 AD
05:49–09:41 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.72; Saros 117)
This subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse may be visible to a skilled observer at maximum eclipse. 72% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth (none of it will be in total shadow), which will cause a gentle shadow gradient across its disc at maximum; the eclipse as a whole will last 3 hours and 52 minutes. The Moon will be visible in the Americas, eastern Asia and Australia, and western Europe and Africa.
25 Apr, 2032 AD
12:22–18:04 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.19; Saros 122)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 1 hour and 6 minutes. The Moon will be 19% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened for viewers from south and east Asia, Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 31 minutes in total.
18 Oct, 2032 AD
16:24–21:40 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.10; Saros 127)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 47 minutes and 6 seconds. The Moon will be 10% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened for viewers in Europe and Asia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 16 minutes in total.
14 Apr, 2033 AD
16:11–22:13 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.09; Saros 132)
A shallow total eclipse will see the Moon in relative darkness for 49 minutes and 12 seconds. The Moon will be 9% of its diameter into the Earth's umbral shadow, and should be significantly darkened for viewers from Europe, Africa, most of Asia, and Australia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 35 minutes in total.
8 Oct, 2033 AD
08:18–13:31 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.35; Saros 137)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 19 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 35% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers in east Asia, Australia, New Zealand, North and Central America, and north-western South America. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 22 minutes in total.
3 Apr, 2034 AD
16:52–21:18 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.85; Saros 142)
This subtle penumbral eclipse eclipse may be visible to a skilled observer at maximum eclipse. 85% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth (none of it will be in total shadow), which will cause a gentle shadow gradient across its disc at maximum; the eclipse as a whole will last 4 hours and 25 minutes. The Moon will be visible in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia.
28 Sep, 2034 AD
00:41–04:50 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.01; Saros 147)
A tiny bite out of the Moon may be visible at maximum, though just 1% of the Moon will be shadowed in a partial eclipse lasting for 26 minutes and 42 seconds and visible in the Americas, Europe, and Africa. A shading across the moon from the Earth's penumbral shadow should be visible at maximum eclipse.
22 Feb, 2035 AD
06:56–11:12 UT
Penumbral Lunar Eclipse
(penum. mag. 0.97; Saros 114)
At maximum eclipse, 97% of the Moon's disc will be partially shaded by the Earth, which will cause a slight shadow gradient across its disc; this subtle effect may be visible to careful observers. No part of the Moon will be in complete shadow. The eclipse will last 4 hours and 16 minutes overall, and will be visible from east Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and the Americas.
19 Aug, 2035 AD
22:46 on 18 Aug–03:35 UT
Partial Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.10; Saros 119)
At maximum eclipse, a small bite out of the Moon should be visible in eastern North America, South America, Europe, Africa, and western Asia. The eclipse will last for 1 hour and 17 minutes, with just 10% of the Moon in shadow at maximum.
11 Feb, 2036 AD
19:33 on 11 Feb–00:49 on 12 Feb UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.30; Saros 124)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 15 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 30% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers from the eastern Americas, Europe, Africa, and most of Asia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 22 minutes in total.
7 Aug, 2036 AD
23:45 on 6 Aug–05:57 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.45; Saros 129)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 35 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 45% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers in most of the Americas, Europe, and Africa. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 51 minutes in total.
31 Jan, 2037 AD
11:24–16:36 UT
Total Lunar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.21; Saros 134)
The Moon will be plunged into darkness for 1 hour and 4 minutes, in a deep total eclipse which will see the Moon 21% of its diameter inside the Earth's umbral shadow. The visual effect of this depends on the state of the Earth's atmosphere, but the Moon may be stained a deep red colour for observers in north and west North America, most of Asia, Australia and New Zealand. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 18 minutes in total.

More Eclipses

If you want to see more eclipses, don't worry — we have data on every eclipse from 2000 BC to 3000 AD. Go to the full lunar eclipse catalog for details.