This catalog has a page for every solar eclipse from 2000 BC to 3000 AD, 11,898 in all, shown in groups of 20 years at a time. You can go to any eclipse by selecting the milennium, century and 20-year period from the navigation tabs above; then click on an eclipse's date in the list below to to go its page.

You can see the lunar eclipses or the combined eclipse catalog by clicking "Lunar Eclipses" or "All Eclipses" in the top-right tabs.

Solar Eclipses, 2001–2020 AD

The following chart shows the paths of the total (in blue), annular (in red), and hybrid (with a yellow outline) solar eclipses. Use the zoom controls on the left to zoom in and out; hover over the marker in the middle of an eclipse track to see information on that eclipse. Bear in mind that for each eclipse shown, a partial eclipse is visible over a much wider area.

Note that eclipse dates are specified relative to UT. You have not selected a timezone for eclipse timings, so all times are shown in UT (essentially GMT).
21 Jun, 2001 AD
09:33–14:34 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 127)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 57 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 200 km wide. It was seen across Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Madagascar. The partial eclipse was visible in Brazil and most of Africa.
14 Dec, 2001 AD
18:03–23:40 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 132)
The Sun was 97% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 3 minutes and 53 seconds and covering a path up to 126 km wide. It was visible across the Pacific and in Central America.
10 Jun, 2002 AD
20:51 on 10 Jun–02:36 on 11 Jun UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.00; Saros 137)
A large annular eclipse covered over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 13 km wide; it lasted just 23 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It was seen from Australasia, across the Pacific and the Mexico coast.
4 Dec, 2002 AD
04:51–10:11 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.02; Saros 142)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 4 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 87 km wide. It was seen across southern Africa, the south Pacific, and southern Australia. The partial eclipse was visible in most of Africa, and western Australia.
31 May, 2003 AD
01:46–06:30 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.94; Saros 147)
This was a marginal annular eclipse, lasting 3 minutes and 37 seconds, with the annular path visible in far north-west Scotland, Iceland, and Greenland. The partial eclipse was visible from much of northern Asia and Europe.
23 Nov, 2003 AD
20:46 on 23 Nov–00:52 on 24 Nov UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 152)
The Sun was darkened for 1 minute and 57 seconds by a dramatic total eclipse covering a very broad path, 495 km wide at maximum. This was a sight worth seeing, and was visible in Antarctica and the extreme south Pacific. The partial eclipse was visible in most of Australia and in Cape Horn.
19 Apr, 2004 AD
11:29–15:38 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.74; Saros 119)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 74% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, created an interesting spectacle for observers in the south of Africa.
14 Oct, 2004 AD
00:54–05:04 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.93; Saros 124)
This was a deep partial eclipse, with 93% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This provided a significant spectacle for those who saw it in eastern Russia, Japan and north-east China.
8 Apr, 2005 AD
17:51–23:20 UT
Hybrid Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.01; Saros 129)
A fleeting hybrid eclipse was visible from south of New Zealand (missing the land) north-east across the Pacific, tailing out in Central America and into South America. It covered a narrow path at most 27 km wide and lasted for 42 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. The partial eclipse was visible in parts of America.
3 Oct, 2005 AD
07:35–13:27 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.96; Saros 134)
The Sun was 96% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 4 minutes and 32 seconds and covering a broad path up to 162 km wide. It was visible from Spain and much of Africa. The partial eclipse was visible from Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and south-west Asia.
29 Mar, 2006 AD
07:36–12:45 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 139)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 7 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 184 km wide. It was seen from eastern Brazil, western Africa, across the eastern Med, and north-east through Asia. The partial eclipse was visible throughout Europe, though not spectacularly in Britain.
22 Sep, 2006 AD
08:39–14:40 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.94; Saros 144)
A small annular eclipse covered only 94% of the Sun in a very broad path, 261 km wide at maximum, and lasted 7 minutes and 9 seconds. It was visible from central America east across the Atlantic, finishing south of Africa. The partial eclipse was visible in eastern South America and south and west Africa.
19 Mar, 2007 AD
00:38–04:25 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.88; Saros 149)
This was a deep partial eclipse, with 88% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This provided a significant spectacle for those who saw it over most of Asia.
11 Sep, 2007 AD
10:25–14:36 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.75; Saros 154)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 75% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, created an interesting spectacle for observers over southern South America, and parts of Antarctica.
7 Feb, 2008 AD
01:38–06:11 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 121)
The Sun was 97% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 2 minutes and 12 seconds and covering a very broad path, 444 km wide at maximum. It was visible from Antarctica and the extreme south Pacific.
1 Aug, 2008 AD
08:04–12:38 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 126)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 27 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 237 km wide. It was seen in northern Canada, northern Russia, and China. The partial eclipse was visible in Europe and most of Asia, though it will not be dramatic in Britain.
26 Jan, 2009 AD
04:56–11:00 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.93; Saros 131)
A small annular eclipse covered only 93% of the Sun in a very broad path, 280 km wide at maximum, and lasted 7 minutes and 54 seconds. It was visible from south of Africa, across the Indian Ocean and in Australasia. The partial eclipse was visible in southern Africa, and parts of Astralia and South Asia.
22 Jul, 2009 AD
23:58 on 21 Jul–05:12 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.08; Saros 136)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 39 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 258 km wide at maximum. It was seen in India and China, and across the Pacific. The partial eclipse was visible across south-east Asia.
15 Jan, 2010 AD
04:05–10:07 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.92; Saros 141)
A small annular eclipse covered only 92% of the Sun in a very broad path, 333 km wide at maximum, and lasted 11 minutes and 8 seconds. It was visible from central Africa, across the Indian Ocean, the southern tip of India, and into China. The partial eclipse was visible in eastern Africa, the Middle East, and south and east Asia.
11 Jul, 2010 AD
17:09–21:57 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 146)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 20 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 259 km wide at maximum. It was seen from north-east of New Zealand, the Pacific, and the southern end of Chile. The partial eclipse was visible in eastern South America.
4 Jan, 2011 AD
06:40–11:00 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.86; Saros 151)
This was a deep partial eclipse, with 86% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This provided a significant spectacle for those who saw it in northern Africa, the Middle East, most of Europe, and western Asia.
1 Jun, 2011 AD
19:25–23:06 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.60; Saros 118)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 60% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, created an interesting spectacle for observers in northern Canada and eastern Russia.
1 Jul, 2011 AD
07:53–09:22 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.10; Saros 156)
With only 10% of the Sun covered at maximum eclipse, this was a very marginal eclipse at best, and rather uninteresting. It was visible from a small patch of ocean near Antarctica.
25 Nov, 2011 AD
04:23–08:17 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.90; Saros 123)
This was a deep partial eclipse, with 90% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This provided a significant spectacle for those who saw it over most of Antarctica, and barely visible in the extreme south of Africa and Tasmania.
20 May, 2012 AD
20:56 on 20 May–02:49 on 21 May UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.94; Saros 128)
The Sun was 94% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 5 minutes and 46 seconds and covering a broad path up to 237 km wide. It was visible from China and Japan, across the north Pacific, and into the western US. The partial eclipse was visible in eastern Asia and most of North America.
13 Nov, 2012 AD
19:37 on 13 Nov–00:45 on 14 Nov UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 2 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 179 km wide. It was seen in northern Australia and across the south Pacific, ending off South America. The partial eclipse was visible over Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific.
10 May, 2013 AD
21:25 on 9 May–03:25 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.95; Saros 138)
The Sun was 95% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 6 minutes and 3 seconds and covering a broad path up to 173 km wide. It was visible from northern Australia into the central Pacific. The partial eclipse was visible over Australia and the South Pacific.
3 Nov, 2013 AD
10:04–15:28 UT
Hybrid Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.02; Saros 143)
The Sun was darkened for 1 minute and 40 seconds by a dramatic hybrid eclipse covering a narrow path at most 58 km wide. This was a sight worth seeing, and was visible across the Atlantic starting east of Florida, and across central Africa. The partial eclipse was visible in northern South America, the extreme eastern US, and most of Africa.
29 Apr, 2014 AD
03:52–08:14 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 148)
A large annular eclipse covered 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in only an extremely narrow strip; however, it was fleeting, lasting just moments at the point of maximum eclipse. It was seen only from a tiny area in Antarctica. The partial eclipse was visible over most of Australia.
23 Oct, 2014 AD
19:37–23:51 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.81; Saros 153)
This was a deep partial eclipse, with 81% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This provided a significant spectacle for those who saw it over most of the USA (except the eastern side), western Canada, and Mexico.
20 Mar, 2015 AD
07:40–11:50 UT
Special Site!
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 120)
eclipse data page
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 47 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 463 km wide at maximum. It was seen from north-west of the British Isles, including the Faroes. The partial eclipse was visible from Europe, north-west Asia, and north-west Africa.
13 Sep, 2015 AD
04:41–09:06 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.79; Saros 125)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 79% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, created an interesting spectacle for observers from southern Africa and parts of Antarctica.
9 Mar, 2016 AD
23:19 on 8 Mar–04:34 UT
Special Site!
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 130)
eclipse data page
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 9 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 155 km wide. It was seen from the Indian Ocean into the Pacific, across Indonesia. The partial eclipse was visible in South-east Asia and north and west Australia.
1 Sep, 2016 AD
06:13–12:00 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 135)
A large annular eclipse covered 97% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a path up to 100 km wide; it lasted 3 minutes and 6 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It was seen across central Africa southwards to Madagascar and into the Indian Ocean. The partial eclipse was visible across most of Africa and parts of the Middle East.
26 Feb, 2017 AD
12:10–17:36 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse covered over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 31 km wide; it lasted 44 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It was seen from southern South America, across the Atlantic, and into southern Africa. The partial eclipse was visible in southern South America, and south-west Africa.
21 Aug, 2017 AD
15:46–21:04 UT
Special Site!
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.03; Saros 145)
eclipse data page
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 40 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 115 km wide. It will be seen across the central US. The partial eclipse will be visible from the whole of North America, northern South America, and western Europe and Africa.
15 Feb, 2018 AD
18:55–22:47 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.60; Saros 150)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 60% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle for observers from most of Chile and Argentina, and most of Antarctica.
13 Jul, 2018 AD
01:48–04:13 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.34; Saros 117)
A small partial eclipse will be visible from a patch of ocean between Australia and Antarctica. With just 34% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this will be of limited interest.
11 Aug, 2018 AD
08:02–11:30 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.74; Saros 155)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 74% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle for observers from the Arctic, Greenland, Scandinavia, and north and east Asia.
6 Jan, 2019 AD
23:34 on 5 Jan–03:48 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.71; Saros 122)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 71% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle for observers from north-east China, Japan, and eastern Russia.
2 Jul, 2019 AD
16:55–21:50 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 127)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 33 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 201 km wide. It will be seen across the south Pacific and over Chile and Argentina. The partial eclipse will be visible in most of South America.
26 Dec, 2019 AD
02:29–08:05 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 132)
A large annular eclipse will cover 97% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a path up to 118 km wide; it will last 3 minutes and 40 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It will be seen from Saudi Arabia, Qatar, the UAE, and Oman, across southern India and Sri Lanka, to Indonesia and Malaysia. The partial eclipse will be visible across the Middle East, south-east Asia, and Australasia.
21 Jun, 2020 AD
03:45–09:33 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 137)
A large annular eclipse will cover over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 21 km wide; it will last 38 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It will be seen from mid Africa, across the Middle East, northern India and south-east Asia. The partial eclipse will be visible over western Africa, the Middle East, and south and east Asia.
14 Dec, 2020 AD
13:33–18:53 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.03; Saros 142)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 10 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 90 km wide. It will be seen from the Pacific to the Atlantic via Chile and Argentina. The partial eclipse will be visible over southern South America.