Solar Eclipses in Saros Series 133

This page lists all the solar eclipses in saros series 133. The series contains 72 eclipses, occurring over 1280 years.

The following chart shows the paths of the total (in blue), annular (in red), and hybrid (in yellow) solar eclipses in the series which also have mapping data; this is restricted to eclipses between 1900 and 2100, so only a selection of eclipses from the series are shown. Use the zoom controls on the left to zoom in and out; hover over the marker in the middle of an eclipse track to see information on that eclipse. Bear in mind that for each eclipse shown, a partial eclipse is visible over a much wider area.

Note that eclipse dates are specified relative to UT. You have not selected a timezone for eclipse timings, so all times are shown in UT (essentially GMT).
13 Jul, 1219 AD
max: 08:12 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.03; Saros 133)
With only 3% of the Sun covered at maximum eclipse, this was a very marginal eclipse at best, and rather uninteresting.
23 Jul, 1237 AD
max: 15:10 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.17; Saros 133)
With only 17% of the Sun covered at maximum eclipse, this was a very marginal eclipse at best, and rather uninteresting.
3 Aug, 1255 AD
max: 22:13 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.30; Saros 133)
A small partial eclipse barely darkened the Sun. With just 30% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this was of limited interest.
14 Aug, 1273 AD
max: 05:26 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.42; Saros 133)
A small partial eclipse barely darkened the Sun. With just 42% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this was of limited interest.
25 Aug, 1291 AD
max: 12:47 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.53; Saros 133)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 53% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, created an interesting spectacle.
4 Sep, 1309 AD
max: 20:17 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.63; Saros 133)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 63% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, created an interesting spectacle.
16 Sep, 1327 AD
max: 03:57 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.72; Saros 133)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 72% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, created an interesting spectacle.
26 Sep, 1345 AD
max: 11:47 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.79; Saros 133)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 79% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, created an interesting spectacle.
7 Oct, 1363 AD
max: 19:46 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.85; Saros 133)
This was a deep partial eclipse, with 85% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This provided a significant spectacle for those who saw it.
18 Oct, 1381 AD
max: 03:54 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.90; Saros 133)
This was a deep partial eclipse, with 90% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This provided a significant spectacle for those who saw it.
29 Oct, 1399 AD
max: 12:11 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.94; Saros 133)
This was a deep partial eclipse, with 94% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This provided a significant spectacle for those who saw it.
8 Nov, 1417 AD
max: 20:36 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 133)
This was a deep partial eclipse, with 97% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This provided a significant spectacle for those who saw it.
20 Nov, 1435 AD
max: 05:07 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 133)
A large annular eclipse covered 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in only an extremely narrow strip; however, it was fleeting, lasting just moments at the point of maximum eclipse.
30 Nov, 1453 AD
max: 13:42 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.98; Saros 133)
A large annular eclipse covered 98% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 469 km wide at maximum; it lasted 1 minute and 14 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
11 Dec, 1471 AD
max: 22:21 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 133)
A large annular eclipse covered 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 287 km wide at maximum; it lasted 1 minute and 2 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
22 Dec, 1489 AD
max: 07:01 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 133)
A large annular eclipse covered over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 175 km wide; it lasted 47 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
2 Jan, 1508 AD
max: 15:42 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 133)
A large annular eclipse covered over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a path up to 92 km wide; it lasted just 28 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
13 Jan, 1526 AD
max: 00:19 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.00; Saros 133)
A large annular eclipse covered over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 19 km wide; it lasted a brief 7 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
24 Jan, 1544 AD
max: 08:55 UT
Hybrid Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.00; Saros 133)
A fleeting hybrid eclipse covered a narrow path at most 40 km wide and lasted for just 16 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
3 Feb, 1562 AD
max: 17:25 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.01; Saros 133)
A fleeting total eclipse covered a path up to 89 km wide and lasted for 41 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
15 Feb, 1580 AD
max: 01:50 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.02; Saros 133)
The Sun was darkened for 1 minute and 7 seconds by a dramatic total eclipse covering a path up to 127 km wide. This was a sight worth seeing.
7 Mar, 1598 AD
max: 10:08 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.02; Saros 133)
The Sun was darkened for 1 minute and 33 seconds by a dramatic total eclipse covering a path up to 156 km wide. This was a sight worth seeing.
17 Mar, 1616 AD
max: 18:20 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.03; Saros 133)
The Sun was darkened for 1 minute and 58 seconds by a dramatic total eclipse covering a broad path up to 180 km wide. This was a sight worth seeing.
29 Mar, 1634 AD
max: 02:23 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.03; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 24 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 198 km wide.
8 Apr, 1652 AD
max: 10:21 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 49 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 213 km wide.
19 Apr, 1670 AD
max: 18:11 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 15 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 225 km wide.
30 Apr, 1688 AD
max: 01:57 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 40 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 234 km wide.
12 May, 1706 AD
max: 09:35 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 6 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 242 km wide at maximum.
22 May, 1724 AD
max: 17:09 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 33 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 247 km wide at maximum.
3 Jun, 1742 AD
max: 00:39 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes exactly at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 251 km wide at maximum.
13 Jun, 1760 AD
max: 08:09 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 27 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 254 km wide at maximum.
24 Jun, 1778 AD
max: 15:34 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 52 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 255 km wide at maximum. It was seen from a broad band running across Mexico and up the eastern coast of the US, and in North Africa. The partial eclipse was visible across North America, Europe, and western Africa.
4 Jul, 1796 AD
max: 23:02 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.08; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 15 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 255 km wide at maximum.
17 Jul, 1814 AD
max: 06:30 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.08; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 33 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 254 km wide at maximum.
27 Jul, 1832 AD
max: 14:01 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.08; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 46 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 252 km wide at maximum.
7 Aug, 1850 AD
max: 21:33 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.08; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 50 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 249 km wide at maximum.
18 Aug, 1868 AD
max: 05:12 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.08; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 47 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 245 km wide at maximum.
29 Aug, 1886 AD
max: 12:55 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 36 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 240 km wide at maximum.
9 Sep, 1904 AD
max: 20:44 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 6 minutes and 20 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 234 km wide.
21 Sep, 1922 AD
02:04–07:16 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.07; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 59 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 226 km wide. It was seen in the horn of Africa, and across Australia.
1 Oct, 1940 AD
max: 12:43 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 35 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 218 km wide.
12 Oct, 1958 AD
max: 20:54 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 5 minutes and 11 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 209 km wide.
23 Oct, 1976 AD
max: 05:12 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 46 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 199 km wide.
3 Nov, 1994 AD
max: 13:39 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 23 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 189 km wide.
13 Nov, 2012 AD
19:37 on 13 Nov–00:45 on 14 Nov UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 2 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 179 km wide. It was seen in northern Australia and across the south Pacific, ending off South America. The partial eclipse was visible over Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific.
25 Nov, 2030 AD
04:16–09:23 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 44 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 169 km wide. It will be seen across Namibia, Botswana, South Africa, Lesotho, and south-eastern Australia. The partial eclipse will be visible from southern Africa , the southern Indian Ocean, Australia, and Antarctica.
5 Dec, 2048 AD
13:00–18:07 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 28 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 160 km wide. It will be seen in Chile, Argentina, Tristan da Cunha, Namibia and Botswana. The partial eclipse will be visible from southern South America.
17 Dec, 2066 AD
21:47 on 16 Dec–02:55 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 14 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 152 km wide. It will be seen in far south-western Australia, the southern part of New Zealand's Stewart Island / Rakiura, and the south Pacific. The partial eclipse will be visible in Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific.
27 Dec, 2084 AD
max: 09:11 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 4 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 146 km wide.
8 Jan, 2103 AD
max: 18:00 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 57 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 140 km wide.
19 Jan, 2121 AD
max: 02:50 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 52 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 137 km wide.
30 Jan, 2139 AD
max: 11:37 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 49 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 135 km wide.
9 Feb, 2157 AD
max: 20:19 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 49 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 135 km wide.
21 Feb, 2175 AD
max: 04:58 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 50 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 135 km wide.
3 Mar, 2193 AD
max: 13:29 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 53 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 137 km wide.
15 Mar, 2211 AD
max: 21:53 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 57 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 140 km wide.
26 Mar, 2229 AD
max: 06:09 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 2 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 144 km wide.
6 Apr, 2247 AD
max: 14:17 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 7 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 149 km wide.
16 Apr, 2265 AD
max: 22:16 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 11 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 154 km wide.
28 Apr, 2283 AD
max: 06:07 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 13 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 160 km wide.
9 May, 2301 AD
max: 13:48 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 10 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 168 km wide.
20 May, 2319 AD
max: 21:24 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.03; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 2 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 178 km wide.
31 May, 2337 AD
max: 04:52 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.03; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 46 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 195 km wide.
11 Jun, 2355 AD
max: 12:13 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.03; Saros 133)
A dramatic total eclipse will plunge the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 18 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 233 km wide.
21 Jun, 2373 AD
max: 19:29 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.02; Saros 133)
This marginal total eclipse will last 1 minute and 24 seconds, with the total path covering a small area in the south polar regions.
3 Jul, 2391 AD
max: 02:41 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.87; Saros 133)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 87% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it.
13 Jul, 2409 AD
max: 09:51 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.72; Saros 133)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 72% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle.
24 Jul, 2427 AD
max: 16:58 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.57; Saros 133)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 57% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle.
4 Aug, 2445 AD
max: 00:06 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.43; Saros 133)
A small partial eclipse will barely darken the Sun. With just 43% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this will be of limited interest.
15 Aug, 2463 AD
max: 07:15 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.29; Saros 133)
A small partial eclipse will barely darken the Sun. With just 29% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this will be of limited interest.
25 Aug, 2481 AD
max: 14:26 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.16; Saros 133)
With only 16% of the Sun covered at maximum eclipse, this will be a very marginal eclipse at best, and rather uninteresting.
5 Sep, 2499 AD
max: 21:41 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.03; Saros 133)
With only 3% of the Sun covered at maximum eclipse, this will be a very marginal eclipse at best, and rather uninteresting.