Solar Eclipses in Saros Series 140

This page lists all the solar eclipses in saros series 140. The series contains 71 eclipses, occurring over 1262 years.

The following chart shows the paths of the total (in blue), annular (in red), and hybrid (in yellow) solar eclipses in the series which also have mapping data; this is restricted to eclipses between 1900 and 2100, so only a selection of eclipses from the series are shown. Use the zoom controls on the left to zoom in and out; hover over the marker in the middle of an eclipse track to see information on that eclipse. Bear in mind that for each eclipse shown, a partial eclipse is visible over a much wider area.

Note that eclipse dates are specified relative to UT. You have not selected a timezone for eclipse timings, so all times are shown in UT (essentially GMT).
16 Apr, 1512 AD
max: 06:19 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.00; Saros 140)
With only 0% of the Sun covered at maximum eclipse, this was a very marginal eclipse at best, and rather uninteresting.
27 Apr, 1530 AD
max: 14:04 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.11; Saros 140)
With only 11% of the Sun covered at maximum eclipse, this was a very marginal eclipse at best, and rather uninteresting.
7 May, 1548 AD
max: 21:44 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.23; Saros 140)
A small partial eclipse barely darkened the Sun. With just 23% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this was of limited interest.
19 May, 1566 AD
max: 05:18 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.35; Saros 140)
A small partial eclipse barely darkened the Sun. With just 35% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this was of limited interest.
8 Jun, 1584 AD
max: 12:50 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.48; Saros 140)
A small partial eclipse barely darkened the Sun. With just 48% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this was of limited interest.
19 Jun, 1602 AD
max: 20:17 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.62; Saros 140)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 62% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, created an interesting spectacle.
30 Jun, 1620 AD
max: 03:44 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.75; Saros 140)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 75% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, created an interesting spectacle.
11 Jul, 1638 AD
max: 11:10 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.89; Saros 140)
This was a deep partial eclipse, with 89% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This provided a significant spectacle for those who saw it.
21 Jul, 1656 AD
max: 18:39 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.02; Saros 140)
A fleeting total eclipse covered only an extremely narrow strip and lasted for just moments at the point of maximum eclipse.
2 Aug, 1674 AD
max: 02:07 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.06; Saros 140)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 8 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 498 km wide at maximum.
12 Aug, 1692 AD
max: 09:40 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 140)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes and 10 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 353 km wide at maximum.
24 Aug, 1710 AD
max: 17:17 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 140)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 4 minutes exactly at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a very broad path, 282 km wide at maximum.
4 Sep, 1728 AD
max: 00:59 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.05; Saros 140)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 44 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 236 km wide.
15 Sep, 1746 AD
max: 08:46 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 140)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 23 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 200 km wide.
25 Sep, 1764 AD
max: 16:41 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.04; Saros 140)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 3 minutes and 1 second at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a broad path up to 171 km wide.
7 Oct, 1782 AD
max: 00:43 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.03; Saros 140)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 37 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 144 km wide.
18 Oct, 1800 AD
max: 08:51 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.03; Saros 140)
A dramatic total eclipse plunged the Sun into darkness for 2 minutes and 14 seconds at maximum, creating an amazing spectacle for observers in a path up to 120 km wide.
29 Oct, 1818 AD
max: 17:06 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.02; Saros 140)
The Sun was darkened for 1 minute and 51 seconds by a dramatic total eclipse covering a path up to 98 km wide. This was a sight worth seeing.
9 Nov, 1836 AD
max: 01:29 UT
Total Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.02; Saros 140)
The Sun was darkened for 1 minute and 28 seconds by a dramatic total eclipse covering a narrow path at most 77 km wide. This was a sight worth seeing.
20 Nov, 1854 AD
max: 09:56 UT
Hybrid Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.01; Saros 140)
The Sun was darkened for 1 minute and 7 seconds by a dramatic hybrid eclipse covering a narrow path at most 57 km wide. This was a sight worth seeing.
30 Nov, 1872 AD
max: 18:29 UT
Hybrid Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.01; Saros 140)
The Sun was darkened for 47 seconds by a dramatic hybrid eclipse covering a narrow path at most 40 km wide. This was a sight worth seeing.
12 Dec, 1890 AD
max: 03:05 UT
Hybrid Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.01; Saros 140)
A fleeting hybrid eclipse covered a narrow path at most 24 km wide and lasted for just 28 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
23 Dec, 1908 AD
max: 11:44 UT
Hybrid Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.00; Saros 140)
A fleeting hybrid eclipse covered a narrow path at most 10 km wide and lasted for a brief 12 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
3 Jan, 1927 AD
max: 20:22 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.00; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse covered over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in only a tiny path, just 2 km wide; however, it was fleeting, lasting a very brief 3 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
14 Jan, 1945 AD
max: 05:01 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.00; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse covered over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 12 km wide; it lasted just 15 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
25 Jan, 1963 AD
max: 13:36 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 1.00; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse covered over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 20 km wide; it lasted just 25 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
4 Feb, 1981 AD
max: 22:08 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse covered over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 25 km wide; it lasted 33 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
16 Feb, 1999 AD
03:52–09:15 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse covered over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 29 km wide; it lasted 40 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It was seen from south of South Africa, across the Indian Ocean and across Australia. The partial eclipse was visible from South America, Indonesia, and most of Australia.
26 Feb, 2017 AD
12:10–17:36 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse covered over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 31 km wide; it lasted 44 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It was seen from southern South America, across the Atlantic, and into southern Africa. The partial eclipse was visible in southern South America, and south-west Africa.
9 Mar, 2035 AD
20:20 on 9 Mar–01:48 on 10 Mar UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 31 km wide; it will last 48 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse. It will be seen across central New Zealand and Reao Atoll in the Tuamotos. The partial eclipse will be visible in eastern Australia, New Zealand, and the south Pacific.
20 Mar, 2053 AD
max: 07:06 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 31 km wide; it will last 50 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
31 Mar, 2071 AD
max: 14:58 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 31 km wide; it will last 52 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
10 Apr, 2089 AD
max: 22:41 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 30 km wide; it will last 53 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
23 Apr, 2107 AD
max: 06:15 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 30 km wide; it will last 56 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
3 May, 2125 AD
max: 13:38 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 31 km wide; it will last 59 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
14 May, 2143 AD
max: 20:53 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover over 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 33 km wide; it will last 1 minute and 5 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
25 May, 2161 AD
max: 03:59 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 36 km wide; it will last 1 minute and 12 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
5 Jun, 2179 AD
max: 10:59 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 41 km wide; it will last 1 minute and 21 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
15 Jun, 2197 AD
max: 17:52 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.99; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover 99% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 48 km wide; it will last 1 minute and 32 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
28 Jun, 2215 AD
max: 00:40 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.98; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover 98% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 58 km wide; it will last 1 minute and 44 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
8 Jul, 2233 AD
max: 07:26 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.98; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover 98% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a narrow path at most 70 km wide; it will last 1 minute and 59 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
19 Jul, 2251 AD
max: 14:09 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.98; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover 98% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a path up to 85 km wide; it will last 2 minutes and 16 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
29 Jul, 2269 AD
max: 20:52 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 140)
A large annular eclipse will cover 97% of the Sun, creating a dramatic spectacle for observers in a path up to 104 km wide; it will last 2 minutes and 35 seconds at the point of maximum eclipse.
10 Aug, 2287 AD
max: 03:36 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.97; Saros 140)
The Sun will be 97% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 2 minutes and 56 seconds and covering a path up to 127 km wide.
21 Aug, 2305 AD
max: 10:23 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.96; Saros 140)
The Sun will be 96% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 3 minutes and 21 seconds and covering a path up to 155 km wide.
1 Sep, 2323 AD
max: 17:12 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.96; Saros 140)
The Sun will be 96% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 3 minutes and 48 seconds and covering a broad path up to 191 km wide.
12 Sep, 2341 AD
max: 00:08 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.95; Saros 140)
The Sun will be 95% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 4 minutes and 19 seconds and covering a broad path up to 234 km wide.
23 Sep, 2359 AD
max: 07:09 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.95; Saros 140)
The Sun will be 95% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 4 minutes and 53 seconds and covering a very broad path, 291 km wide at maximum.
3 Oct, 2377 AD
max: 14:17 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.94; Saros 140)
The Sun will be 94% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting 5 minutes and 29 seconds and covering a very broad path, 366 km wide at maximum.
14 Oct, 2395 AD
max: 21:31 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.94; Saros 140)
A small annular eclipse will cover only 94% of the Sun in a very broad path, 471 km wide at maximum, and will last 6 minutes and 7 seconds.
25 Oct, 2413 AD
max: 04:54 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.93; Saros 140)
A small annular eclipse will cover only 93% of the Sun in a very broad path, 628 km wide at maximum, and will last 6 minutes and 43 seconds.
5 Nov, 2431 AD
max: 12:26 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.92; Saros 140)
A small annular eclipse will cover only 92% of the Sun in a very broad path, 902 km wide at maximum, and will last 7 minutes and 15 seconds.
15 Nov, 2449 AD
max: 20:03 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.92; Saros 140)
This marginal annular eclipse will last 7 minutes and 35 seconds, with the annular path covering a small area in the north polar regions.
27 Nov, 2467 AD
max: 03:48 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.94; Saros 140)
The Sun will be 94% covered in a moderate annular eclipse, lasting just moments and covering only an extremely narrow strip.
7 Dec, 2485 AD
max: 11:38 UT
Annular Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.91; Saros 140)
A small annular eclipse will cover only 91% of the Sun in only an extremely narrow strip, and will last just moments.
19 Dec, 2503 AD
max: 19:34 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.89; Saros 140)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 89% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it.
30 Dec, 2521 AD
max: 03:32 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.86; Saros 140)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 86% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it.
10 Jan, 2540 AD
max: 11:34 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.85; Saros 140)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 85% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it.
20 Jan, 2558 AD
max: 19:35 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.83; Saros 140)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 83% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it.
1 Feb, 2576 AD
max: 03:34 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.82; Saros 140)
This will be a deep partial eclipse, with 82% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center. This will provide a significant spectacle for those who will see it.
11 Feb, 2594 AD
max: 11:30 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.80; Saros 140)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 80% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle.
23 Feb, 2612 AD
max: 19:22 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.77; Saros 140)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 77% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle.
6 Mar, 2630 AD
max: 03:07 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.74; Saros 140)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 74% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle.
16 Mar, 2648 AD
max: 10:45 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.69; Saros 140)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 69% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle.
27 Mar, 2666 AD
max: 18:15 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.64; Saros 140)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 64% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle.
7 Apr, 2684 AD
max: 01:37 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.57; Saros 140)
A moderate partial eclipse, with 57% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, will create an interesting spectacle.
19 Apr, 2702 AD
max: 08:49 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.49; Saros 140)
A small partial eclipse will barely darken the Sun. With just 49% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this will be of limited interest.
29 Apr, 2720 AD
max: 15:54 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.41; Saros 140)
A small partial eclipse will barely darken the Sun. With just 41% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this will be of limited interest.
10 May, 2738 AD
max: 22:50 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.30; Saros 140)
A small partial eclipse will barely darken the Sun. With just 30% of the Sun covered for viewers closest to the center, this will be of limited interest.
21 May, 2756 AD
max: 05:40 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.20; Saros 140)
With only 20% of the Sun covered at maximum eclipse, this will be a very marginal eclipse at best, and rather uninteresting.
1 Jun, 2774 AD
max: 12:22 UT
Partial Solar Eclipse
(umbral mag. 0.07; Saros 140)
With only 7% of the Sun covered at maximum eclipse, this will be a very marginal eclipse at best, and rather uninteresting.